Archive for June, 2010

Awela

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

Glyph of the word 'awela'.

awela

  • (v.) to thank someone
  • (n.) thanks
  • (expr.) thanks, thank you (sometimes shortened to wela)

Awela!
“Thanks!”

Notes: Well, since I brought it up yesterday, here it is!

Awela is one of those words that’s just spelled out, but it is a native Kamakawi word. Its spelling was a late addition, though (previously it was just something you said).

To follow up on a comment on yesterday’s post, yes, the Kamakawi do marry, and I’ve got a bunch of interesting terminology and ideas that go with the institution which I’ll introduce by and by. Anniversaries, though, don’t seem likely—same with birthdays, in fact, as both rely on a calendar—some way of marking precisely when something occurred one year prior. That doesn’t seem like something that’s natively Kamakawi. In the “modern” state, though, any such terms—along with the concepts—will have been borrowed directly from Zhyler speakers.

Oh, hey, and since we’re at it, Zhyler speakers are referred to as the Zhyxÿy. Ha, ha. Wow, that’s a mess. Okay, in IPA, that’s /ʒy.ˈxɯj/. In the romanization system I devised for the website, it’s Žüxÿy. I already showed you the half-romanization/half-ASCII form. The full ASCII form I’d use would be Zhyxuhy. Dang. Looks fine in the orthography

Okay, how about this. This isn’t exactly the right word, but how about Zhüdüy? That’s more like the ruling class, but when it comes to invaders, there’s little difference, right? So there you go. From here on out, Zhyler speakers will be referred to as the Zhüdüy. That’s not too bad.

Affixes in Esperanto

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010
Is it only me or does anybody else think Esperanto's affixes are cool most of the times? I mean, I know as well as the next guy the pros and cons about Esperanto, but some of the affixes, those you use to modify the root and make new words, are really interesting. I like it how they are very ambiguous; for instance, you have 'ad' or 'aĵ', which literally mean "a lasting or repeated action" and "concrete thing", I like this last one in relation to 'uj' "something that contains the thing indicated by the root". I say this is very interesting because it is very flexible to use, it can mean either something that contains but it is also mostly used for nations or trees, as they contain citizens and fruits. So for instance you have:

pomo. Apple > pomujo. Apple-tree.
hispana. Spanish > Hispanujo. Spain.

It's noteworthy that it lets you make a pair with 'ar' an infix that means "a group of", so you can have:

libro. Book > libraro & librujo

The first would mean "a group of books" as in a collection, the latter would mean the thing holding your books, a bibliotheque or a book-shelf. When you look at your own collection of books comfortably sitting in your book-shelves they can both be called either libraro or librujo, but the first would mean the books in themselves, while the latter would mean the furniture which contains them.

And that's not all, my favorite must be 'ing' which means "something that is partially introduced in what is expressed by the root". So with it you can have:

fingro. Finger > fingringo. Thimble.

I like this quite much, and the same infix could be also used in more flexible ways in conlangs, thoughts anyone?

Λυрιοнιεc тecειc (Lurion temples)

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010
The Luriones use тecειc (temples) as a place to pray, praise and meditate, as well as to meet for various reasons.

There are several types of temples, in most of them the seven main Gods, i.e. Δрαгο, Xωтαнο, Aκтοр, Ἱδοр, Ἁcмο, Cιцο and Mαο, are worshipped. Here I will discuss some of the most common.

Basic layout
Lurion temples housing multiple gods all have a similar layout, regardless of their shape.
The light blue area is the main room, which is available to everybody all during the day and night. The coloured areas are the actual rooms where each god is worshipped, praised and sacrificed to. These can only be entered by ᴧυрιοнιεc οικεнтec (Lurion citizens), thus not by βαрβαрec (barbarians, i.e. Fartes, Gerimes etc), δαмκαтec (slaves) or criminals, and only under the supervision or with the approval of тecec, priests.
Finally, the dark blue area is used as a back entrence for priests, a storage room and for other religious activities, e.g. removing animal sacrifices.

The front (shown at the bottom of the sketch) can be either a wall with one or multiple gates in it, or a мακουрυ (a row of pillars or columns). The whole temple can also be surrounded by a continuous мακουрυ, called an αмφιмακουрυ.

Тεтрειυ (Tetrium)
The Tetreiu or Tetrium is the most basic temple, it is rectangular but, unlike most Greek temples and modern churches etc, its main entrance is located on its longest side. It can be used to worship any combination of gods.

῾Єκтειυ (Hectium)
The Hekteiu has the shape of a hectagon, which is a holy shape in Lurion religion. Often with a dot in the middle, it resembles the seven main gods, with Δрαгο in the middle. However, for practical reasons, the rooms are position against the back three walls and are accessible via the main room in front. It is only used in the worship of these seven gods.

Κυκᴧειυ (Cyclium)
The Cyclium is a round temple, where most often only one deity is sacrificed to. It is often accompanied by a κυκᴧιмακουрυ (a circular αмφιмακουрυ), or sometimes by some other round formation of e.g. trees (like the Cyclarbrium), flames or stones.

Δουκᴧειυ (Duclium)
The Doukleiu, which is shortened from Δουικυκᴧειυ, has the shape of half a circle. It usually has a straight wall with only one door in it. When entering this, one can turn his head from left to right, eyeing the wide variaty of gods that is worshipped there. The rendezvous generally take place around the back side of the temple.

That's basically it, although villages and cities further away from the central Lurionas may have other types of temples.

xkora’het: goal, point

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

If the rejistanis invented the soccer, the word xkora’het would not be required. Instead itva’het’ny (malus points, see yesterday’s posting, derived from the word ‘itva: to fail) or lehiju’het’ny (same thing, but derived from the word ‘lehiju: to concede) would be assigned to the team scored against. However since it was not, the idea of positive points came into the -tani and the word score was loaned into xkora’het. It generally means any positive point in sports, a goal in soccer, hockey or handball, a point in basketball, etc. ‘xkora is the verb for ‘to score’. Oh, and get your mind out of the gutter, not in that idiomatic meaning*!

The requested word however was ‘ghost goal’ and apparently, this word has two meanings, either a goal which should count but does not or a goal which should not count but does. In both cases it can be described by general paraphrasings like “merdisde’het” (misdecision), “merxkora’het” (mis-goal), “minjialari’he mi’la’ena oasua’het’mi” (the referee needed his dog), “minjialari’he mi’jeduni ji mi’vyei” (the referee is drunk/high and hallucinates!), “ada’he mi’ma’ta ‘mesu!” (the linesman is blind) (BTW: adding the curse slani can be used to add empahsis to the expression). But a bit more specific terms do exist. A goal, which the speaker thinks was granted even though it never should have been (Wembley!) is a “xkora’het aru’veri” literally: an existenceless goal. In the other case, when a clear goal was not granted (very unlike in Bloemfontein where the ball didn’t cross the line), it is a “xkora’het vuraknil” a denied goal.

Example: Xkora mji’het mi’jaliex’ta milhan’jet. (goal four-ORD 3S-valid-NEG game-TEMP: During the game, the 4th goal was invalid/was a ghost goal.)

* it takes a dirty mind to know one, I know.


Καтαᴧυ

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010
Following in the footsteps of David J. Peterson, whom I deeply respect, I will post cat related words, sentences and photos of my two cute cats (Noortje and Streepje) every tuesday! This will help increase my vocab, as well as allow me to keep posting on a consistent basis.

Єυтιε Καтαᴧυ!

Καтαᴧυ is a combination of καтιc ("cat") and -αᴧυ, the suffix meaning "-day" (from καᴧυ). Coincidentally, it is also a slight anagram of ακтαᴧυ, the word for the second day of a week, or "tuesday", named after the God of War, Aκтοр. Furthermore, he is the god of felines.

And now, for some introduction:

My cats are named Noortje and Streepje, or Нοртα Cтрeπακε, they are around 10 years old, enjoy being petted, love being fed and spend whole days sleeping on beds, in gardens or in baskets of freshly washed clothing.

On here you see Streepje, named after his many stripes (I guess), relaxing in a small sunlit part of our back garden.
And here is her sister, Noortje (supposedly named when Sweden was playing football, but I was 5 or 6 at the time, so I can not verify that). Isn't she cute? She's just about to sprint to the kitchen, having smelled my father opening a package of minced meat. I think they are secretly spoiled by my mother when she's cooking.
Oh, and if you're thinking that they look so much a like, I can tell them apart perfectly well. Not only by the little stripe/speck next to the nose that Noortje has and Streepje hasn't (ironic, eh?). I can tell by looking only at their tail, their hair, their meowing, the way they move etc. On top of that, one can ofcourse tell by their completely different characters. Noortje is quite shy, whereas Streepje will just pounce your lap and demands you to sit still, being utterly surprised when you actually move for something as trivial as sipping your tea. How rude some guests can be.

And know, a test! Which one is sleeping (or pretending to sleep, as another photograph taken moments later reveals) contentfully in this picture?

Καтαᴧυ

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010
Following in the footsteps of David J. Peterson, whom I deeply respect, I will post cat related words, sentences and photos of my two cute cats (Noortje and Streepje) every tuesday! This will help increase my vocab, as well as allow me to keep posting on a consistent basis.

Єυтιε Καтαᴧυ!

Καтαᴧυ is a combination of καтιc ("cat") and -αᴧυ, the suffix meaning "-day" (from καᴧυ). Coincidentally, it is also a slight anagram of ακтαᴧυ, the word for the second day of a week, or "tuesday", named after the God of War, Aκтοр. Furthermore, he is the god of felines.

And now, for some introduction:

My cats are named Noortje and Streepje, or Нοртα Cтрeπακε, they are around 10 years old, enjoy being petted, love being fed and spend whole days sleeping on beds, in gardens or in baskets of freshly washed clothing.

On here you see Streepje, named after his many stripes (I guess), relaxing in a small sunlit part of our back garden.
And here is her sister, Noortje (supposedly named when Sweden was playing football, but I was 5 or 6 at the time, so I can not verify that). Isn't she cute? She's just about to sprint to the kitchen, having smelled my father opening a package of minced meat. I think they are secretly spoiled by my mother when she's cooking.
Oh, and if you're thinking that they look so much a like, I can tell them apart perfectly well. Not only by the little stripe/speck next to the nose that Noortje has and Streepje hasn't (ironic, eh?). I can tell by looking only at their tail, their hair, their meowing, the way they move etc. On top of that, one can ofcourse tell by their completely different characters. Noortje is quite shy, whereas Streepje will just pounce your lap and demands you to sit still, being utterly surprised when you actually move for something as trivial as sipping your tea. How rude some guests can be.

And know, a test! Which one is sleeping (or pretending to sleep, as another photograph taken moments later reveals) contentfully in this picture?

Ulili

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

Glyph of the word 'u'.Glyph of the word 'li'.Glyph of the word 'li'.

ulili

Ka ulili!
“Two years!”

Notes: Today is my and Erin’s second anniversary! Hooray! :D

In honor of the day, I’ve chosen the word for “year” for today. It’s borrowed from Zhyler, as the Kamakawi didn’t have a native concept of “year”. I was also pretty lazy with the glyph: Since it’s just spelled out with the syllabary anyway, I didn’t make a new image, but just used the syllabic glyphs for u and li. I hope you’ll forgive me.

Today will be a fun day! Every day is fun that I get to spend with my wonderful darling wife. :)

‘lehiju: to concede

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

I remember the Conlang Code v2 question about the relation between culture and language:

CuLTural expressiveness: Shows that it is attached to a specific culture.
clt++++ A sociolinguist could create a complete analysis of the mores, technological level, and societal structure of the culture that uses this language just from looking at the language.
clt++ The language is clearly tied to a strong cultural
clt—- You can’t even tell that such a thing as sociolinguistics exists judging from this language.

Personally, I thought that clt++++ was pretty unattainable and unrealistic. But today, I realized something which made me understand that something like clt++++ probably can exist. In Rejistanian, the term, for scoring (in sports) is a loan word. The word for conceding however is not. I thought that this was kinda unrealistic for quite a while but both words were too established to change them. And today, while fighting headaches from hell, I realized why it is in this way. Rejistanian traditional sports have no bonus points (like in soccer) but malus points (like in minigolf and show jumping). Points are not assigned for reaching an objective (like scoring a goal), but for failing to do so (failing to leave the rails untouched when jumping over a fence or failing to defend the ‘flag’ in a capture the flag-like game). Thus, in traditional rejistanian sports, a result like “Sike 10 – KaMaRi 0″ is not bad news for KaMaRi but for Sike. This interpretation also makes sense in explaining the rejistanian love for defensive tactics in soccer.

It all makes sense now! Also the fact that “lehiju’he’ny” (conceders) is a quite common fan insult against bad teams.

Example: Lasane’het’xen mi’la’lehiju xkora’het xi Sike’tes sijon. (team-GEN1PL 3S-PST-concede goal 2 Sike-ABL yesterday: Yesterday, our team conceded 2 points against Sike.)


Рοιειн – to be remembered

Monday, June 28th, 2010
Having reached the 550th Lurion word, one of the latest is a quite interesting one, as it is used in a different construction than most natural languages use.

Рοιειн would mean something like "to be remembered", but it is most often used in the construction рοιι + dative, which means "to remember". For instance, καᴧυ мει рοιι means the same as "I remember the day", but literally "the day is remembered by me".

It originates from the word рιειн, "to return"; thus that sentence could be interpreted as "the day returns to me".

Ὁυ ποιтαc αια рοιcεc.
His deeds will always be remembered.

Fi’ea

Monday, June 28th, 2010

Glyph of the word 'fi’ea'.

fi’ea

  • (v.) to ignore
  • (v.) to shut out
  • (v.) to forget

Ka fi’ea ei ie kavaka…
“I forgot to write.”

Notes: Oops! Forgot to post. But this is kind of turning into a mini-theme: Derivations of hea. Hooray impromptu theme party! :D

Kind of a sad day, though. As everyone knows by now, the US lost to Ghana. Bleh. So tired of the US not dominating this sport… I think I’m perfectly justified in blaming the ABC family of networks.

And if that weren’t enough, Mexico lost to Argentina due (partly) to a disgraceful call. If Japan and Spain lose on the 29th, that’ll be pretty much every country I have blood ties to. Oh well. I guess I’ll have to root for Cristiano Whine-aldo and my wife’s family’s country of origin Portugal. The prospect leaves me cold…