Archive for September, 2010

Funa

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

Glyph of the word 'funa'.

funa

  • (n.) skipjack tuna
  • (n.) idiot

Ei i funa.
“I am an idiot.”

Notes: I live in a condo complex where a permit is required for overnight parking. I have a permit, of course, as I am a residence. The past few days, it’s been blazing hot in Southern California (over 110° at midday), and so when I went to the gym, I opened up all the windows in my car to get a breeze going. Since the permit is flimsy and attaches to the rearview mirror, I thought it prudent to put the permit in my glove compartment so it wouldn’t blow away.

Then I forgot to put it back.

I realized this today when I went out to my car to go to my parents’ house for my stepdad’s birthday. My first thought was, “Oh, geez, the car didn’t get stolen again, did it?” Then the obvious answer dawned on me, and I was ashamed.

Unlike the first time my car was towed (parking in LA is a violent pastime), this time it’ll cost, at the most, $150. That’ll about halve my reserves, but at least I can afford it.

The origin of this word comes from the fact that the skipjack tuna swims in great big schools right up near the surface of the water where even the laziest shark can snap them up. Perhaps they think the odds are on their side (“If there are three hundred of us, what are the odds that hammerhead will get me?!”), but in the long run, they probably get eaten. They’re large, foolish, and yet remarkably fertile fish: the rabbits of the sea, but far more foolish, and not nearly as cuddly.

So, yeah. I’m a skipjack.

‘lerat: to sell

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010

Example: Xe’la’lerat avutu’het’xe derek. Mi’la’ehasi kitivalha xiry.
(1S-PST-sell car-GEN1S old. 3S-PST-be.worth Kitivalha 200)
I sold my old car, it was worth twohundred Kitivalha.

This sentence is not related to anything in my real life, BTW. It is very likely that I will never ever own a car (bad eyes). There are worse things in life though. Especially here in Germany where public transport is very usable and widespread.

Back to ‘lerat: This word should be rather simple to understand. “I sold $thing for $amount $currency” would be: “xe’la’lerat $thing’tes $currency’han $amount”. A lerat’het is a store (no matter the size), lerat’tan means ‘selling’ or ‘sale’. Lerat as adjective often implies that something is related to sales or stores. This can be seen in these terms:
edu’het lerat: mall (literally: set of stores)
eha’het lerat: price (literally: sale value)


Wow.

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010
Єϝтιε Mεтακαтαᴧυ!


What's that? A new letter?

Λυмοειн ὑπнεειнκε βωειтει ἁϝтιιϝ οφтιтeрιει. Єϝ ουрυ.

Lie.inf sleep.inf-and couch.dat self.gen old.comp.dat. Good life.
"To lie and sleep on a couch older than yourself. That's life." 

It is. Well, the Waua only appears in some dialects, such as the one seen above. It's some proto dialect, as it features unassimilated forms (-οειн instead of -οιн) and ancient noun conjugations (-ιϝ instead of -ου).

I have started writing down my grammar and collecting it all, as it seemed some rules were only on this paper, and other collocations can only be found on that webpage. Also, I have been working out the proto-languages' vowel assimiliation, as well as vowel elision.

Wow.

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010
Єϝтιε Mεтακαтαᴧυ!


What's that? A new letter?

Λυмοειн ὑπнεειнκε βωειтει ἁϝтιιϝ οφтιтeрιει. Єϝ ουрυ.

Lie.inf sleep.inf-and couch.dat self.gen old.comp.dat. Good life.
"To lie and sleep on a couch older than yourself. That's life." 

It is. Well, the Waua only appears in some dialects, such as the one seen above. It's some proto dialect, as it features unassimilated forms (-οειн instead of -οιн) and ancient noun conjugations (-ιϝ instead of -ου).

I have started writing down my grammar and collecting it all, as it seemed some rules were only on this paper, and other collocations can only be found on that webpage. Also, I have been working out the proto-languages' vowel assimiliation, as well as vowel elision.

Wow.

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010
Єϝтιε Mεтακαтαᴧυ!


What's that? A new letter?

Λυмοειн ὑπнεειнκε βωειтει ἁϝтιιϝ οφтιтeрιει. Єϝ ουрυ.

Lie.inf sleep.inf-and couch.dat self.gen old.comp.dat. Good life.
"To lie and sleep on a couch older than yourself. That's life." 

It is. Well, the Waua only appears in some dialects, such as the one seen above. It's some proto dialect, as it features unassimilated forms (-οειн instead of -οιн) and ancient noun conjugations (-ιϝ instead of -ου).

I have started writing down my grammar and collecting it all, as it seemed some rules were only on this paper, and other collocations can only be found on that webpage. Also, I have been working out the proto-languages' vowel assimiliation, as well as vowel elision.

Wow.

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010
Єϝтιε Mεтακαтαᴧυ!


What's that? A new letter?

Λυмοειн ὑπнεειнκε βωειтει ἁϝтιιϝ οφтιтeрιει. Єϝ ουрυ.

Lie.inf sleep.inf-and couch.dat self.gen old.comp.dat. Good life.
"To lie and sleep on a couch older than yourself. That's life." 

It is. Well, the Waua only appears in some dialects, such as the one seen above. It's some proto dialect, as it features unassimilated forms (-οειн instead of -οιн) and ancient noun conjugations (-ιϝ instead of -ου).

I have started writing down my grammar and collecting it all, as it seemed some rules were only on this paper, and other collocations can only be found on that webpage. Also, I have been working out the proto-languages' vowel assimiliation, as well as vowel elision.

Oea

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010

Glyph of the word 'oea'.

oea

  • (v.) to flow (as of lava or water)
  • (n.) flow
  • (adj.) flowing

Oku fe’a ei. Amo i lelea oea oi…uku…
“I don’t know. It’s flowing water, with…a thing…”

Notes: The picture that prompted the above sentence, and my Polynesian investigation, is shown below:

A fountain amid succulents.

There is no Kamakawi word for “fountain”, and that got me wondering: Did the Hawaiians have fountains? All signs point to “no”. But many, many ancient peoples did (just consider our word “fountain”, which derives from the Latin, where it meant “fountain” [time didn't really touch this one]). Wikipedia suggests that what a civilization needed for a fountain was a source of fresh water that was above ground level. On the Hawaiian islands, though, the only source of fresh water was above ground level. So what gives?

It would seem that in addition to a source of water above ground level, a civilization would also need some sort of piping or conduit technology, whether it be made of wood, metal or stone. That’s something I’m not sure the ancient Hawaiians had (no need), and something that the Kamakawi most certainly didn’t have. The islands aren’t large, and it’s easy to get from a fresh water source back to the village. In a small place, such piping would seem decadent and unnecessary—like an Electoral College (can you imagine!).

So there’s no word for “fountain” in Kamakawi—or at least not yet. Certainly there will be one in Zhyler (in fact, there probably is, but I’m too lazy to check right now), and it’ll be borrowed into Kamakawi, by and by. All in good time…

Worldwide conlanger locations map, v2

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010
frappr.com/conlang is long dead, alas. And I'd like to know who's near
me. So I've made a new one with Google Maps - hopefully it won't die.
;-)

Please go add yourself now:

http://tinyurl.com/conlangmap

Thanks & enjoy.

minji’het: hand

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

Example: Minji’het’ny’mi min’derek ,mi’la’oyki al sanja’het’mi’jet, lija.
(Hand-PL-GEN3S 3PL-old ,3S-PST-work much life-GEN3S-TEMP, because)
Her/his hands are old because s/he worked much in her/his life.

This word is one of the ones which were created far later than you would think only to appear as a gaping hole in the vocabulary and to be really embarrassing to me.

The verb ‘minji means ‘to hold’ as in ‘to keep in your hand’. There are twocompounds which use it: minjiduxu’het (hand-hit/strike/beat-thing) means fist (and thus is the word from the translation of the Früchte des Zorns song) and minjialari’he (hand-justice-person) means judge.


Lututá

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

Glyph of the word 'lututa'.

lututá

A meya teli o lututá oi tieyalele.
“The desert flower blooms in the summer.”

Notes: Here’s a good looking cactus blossom:

A cactus blossom.

Today’s word comes from the Zhyler word for desert, rÿzða. Though the speakers of Zhyler currently live on a great big island, they used to live on the mainland, and they carried with them a lot of words for concepts utterly foreign to the Kamakawi, one of them being a desert.

To the Kamakawi, a desert seems like just about the most awful place on the face of the earth. They conceive of it as an endless beach with no ocean. In Kamakawi lore, if one finds oneself in this awful place, one can hear (and, perhaps, even see) the waves off in the distance, but no matter how far one goes, one can never reach them.