Archive for March, 2011

Hie

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

Glyph of the word 'hie'.

hie

  • (adv.) still (used also like auxiliaries such as “to keep x‘ing” or “to continue to x“)
  • (adj.) endless, continuous
  • (adv.) onward, on

E kemeaka oi e hala’i hie.
“I feel fantastic and I’m still alive.”

Notes: March 31st, and I’m still kicking. I’ll be here till they shut the lights off.

Hey, I just got some good advice from a spam e-mail. Dig it (punctuation added):

Elephant in the room; new item.

Walk the walk.

Love that: Walk the walk. Sometimes it feels like the only true poets left are spammers…

(At least, until they realize it. Then it all turns to trash.)

April is coming! Summer’s almost here. Happy days are here again. :)

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

pee

We’re on this sentence of the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

ñaxxa jāŋŋeren nā ā majjārien ānen ankēwīke pē hōkēñ;

is a modifier meaning “some” or “few” or “little” and as such is the opposite of . So ānen ankēwīke pē is “with little effort”. So far our sentence reads “The dancers make much beauty with little effort”. Tomorrow, hōkēñ

IPA Helper 2.0

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

After moving my personal website to a new server and a brand new domain, I decided to revamp my IPA Helper, to make it look less like crap, and to improve the functionality of it. And so, at 5 AM I Should Be Asleep o’clock, here I am, posting about it.

This simple little tool is designed, as the name implies, to facilitate the production of IPA pronunciation guides, since most of the IPA resides in various hard-to-reach places of Unicode.

In addition to its point-and-click input interface, you can of course enter text yourself, and your IPA is automatically turned into HTML for you to use e.g. right here on LJ, on your personal websites, and so on. There is even a little option that lets you surround the HTML with... with more HTML! More specifically, the option automagically inserts HTML code that selects an appropriate Unicode font when you put it on a web page.


If there are any problems with the IPA Helper – any at all – please do not hesitate to ask questions below, or contact me through my website. Criticism is always appreciated!

IPA Helper 2.0

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

After moving my personal website to a new server and a brand new domain, I decided to revamp my IPA Helper, to make it look less like crap, and to improve the functionality of it. And so, at 5 AM I Should Be Asleep o’clock, here I am, posting about it.

This simple little tool is designed, as the name implies, to facilitate the production of IPA pronunciation guides, since most of the IPA resides in various hard-to-reach places of Unicode.

In addition to its point-and-click input interface, you can of course enter text yourself, and your IPA is automatically turned into HTML for you to use e.g. right here on LJ, on your personal websites, and so on. There is even a little option that lets you surround the HTML with... with more HTML! More specifically, the option automagically inserts HTML code that selects an appropriate Unicode font when you put it on a web page.


If there are any problems with the IPA Helper – any at all – please do not hesitate to ask questions below, or contact me through my website. Criticism is always appreciated!

Rami vowels, part 1.

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

So I started a stub page on FrathWiki about the Rami alphabet.  Not much in the way of detail yet; this is one of the areas where I have a lot of rudiments worked out, but not much finished polished product.  Didn’t even have any decent image files of the characters put together—so I’m taking some time to make a couple of them now.  As these are small sizes for running text, I’m gracelessly blowing them up to double-size for the purpose of this post.

Letter Value Letter Value
i /i/ ii /iː/
ö /ø/ öö /øː/
e /ɛ/ ee /ɛː/

The same base glyph is used for the short and long variants of each vowel, but the short vowel has a hook along the top, and the long vowel has a hook on the upper right corner.  Most of the vowel forms are reversible: the base shape of /i/ is the inverse of that of /ø/; likewise the reversed /ɛ/ is /ɤ̃/, the reversed /æ/ is /u/, and the reversed /ɑ/ is /o/.

Ati

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

Glyph of the word 'ati'.

ati

  • (n.) sweet potato

Havava ei iu ati oku.
“I don’t like sweet potatoes.”

Notes: Let me tell you something about sweet potatoes. I know they’re kind of the “in” thing right now, and they have a unique flavor. I would like very much to like sweet potatoes—I really would!

But I do not.

Every so often I go to a place that sells sweet potato fries (again, because this is the “in” thing right now), and whatever group I’m with, we usually do get them, but I just don’t like them! I expect a certain level of saltiness and blandness from a fry, and no matter how heavily seasoned they are, I can’t get down with sweet potato fries.

And I don’t like them by themselves, either. Or baked. Or in a casserole. Or with butter. Or whatever. I just don’t like them. I’d like to (I swear!), but I don’t. I apologize to you all, and to sweet potatoes everywhere.

This iku could use with a little cleaning up… Don’t know how my mousing hand missed it during the last clean up. The bottom line is a little wobbly… I’ll get to it some day.

In other news, chocolate is tasty. Big thumb’s up to chocolate. It’s a favorite of mine.

blood is erdo (revisited)

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
erdo = blood (noun) (some things Google found for "erdo": an uncommon term; an unusual last name; ERDO is an acronym for Emergency Relief and Development Overseas a mission of the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada; an unusual first name; Dj Erdo has Mp3s; similar word erdő means forest or woods in Hungarian; Erdő (or Erdo) is the name of cities in Hungary; name of a village in Spain)

Word derivation for "blood" :
Basque = odol, Finnish = veri
Miresua = erdo

My previous Miresua word for blood was ordi. That word seemed too similar to the English word order for my tastes. I can, and do, change my mind on words.

A phonetic sketch for a warrior tongue

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
  • Bodú me bâhan í ratiotí ya bodú, I speak the language of soldiers


  • Speaking a language is like counting the children in your family: BE lANGUAGE X reflexive.

    Every so often Klingon is mentioned on the Conlang list. The conversation usually goes along the lines of "It's nice but the phonetics is deliberately missing sounds that would complete the range of sounds in a human language. So unvoiced /t/ is a dental sound, but voiced /d/ is retroflex articulated on the roof of the mouth. /q/ is a uvular (I think) without an accompanying velar /k/, I understand that they usually go together. The sibilant is a retroflex, a nice sound, but I think it usually appears in languages that has /s/ and /S/.

    I looked up an IPA chart about halfway through doing the above paragraph. Apologies if my inaccuracies made any reader cringe who is more familiar with Klingon or phonetics than I am.

    An idea on my backburner is What Would a Warrior Tongue Look Like If The Gaps Were Filled In? My guess would be:

    P B M
    F V
    T D N S TL
    SH CH J
    T.D.S.
    K G NG KH GH
    Q QH
    '
    W Y L R

    I think that that would be the way that I would do it, with dental and retroflex stops. Comments and suggestions are welcomed. It would be tempting to play with it a bit further, to see what a language sketch using those consonants would look and sound like.

    I went looking through my eclectic language lexicon for words that suggested the Shente were a warrior race. For the most part they weren't there and I used soldier instead of creating a new word for warrior. I feel relieved to discover that about them.

    ankēwīke

    Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

    ankeewiike

    ankēwīke

    We’re on this sentence of the 15th Conlang Relay Text:

    ñaxxa jāŋŋeren nā ā majjārien ānen ankēwīke pē hōkēñ;

    ankēwīke is a stative noun meaning “effort”. Here it is part of a prepositional phrase governed by ānen and modified by , which I will blog about tomorrow.

    High Eolic word of the day: marcána

    Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

    marcána (adverb): next to, around, all around.

    marcána civa tundesá essát rattamec
    all.around become.COMPL body.ESS.PL later fighting.INESS
    “there were [dead] bodies all around after the battle”