Archive for March, 2012

koinu

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012
IPA: ['kʰoj·nʉ]
n. ice. The solid state of frozen water or any other liquid.

This word is pretty simple and it's much too similar to its English equivalent. As a Tulvan word it can be used with the adjective affix but in the sense "ice-like" not only implying cold but the solidification of it being frozen. As for example:

mar ikoinu. Icy blood.

The meaning here would be a block of frozen blood, as opposed to koinu imar bloody ice, which would imply some blood staining an ice block. To say that a man has "icy blood" would be an impossibility since that blood would not be able to be pumped.

koinu

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012
IPA: ['kʰoj·nʉ]
n. ice. The solid state of frozen water or any other liquid.

This word is pretty simple and it's much too similar to its English equivalent. As a Tulvan word it can be used with the adjective affix but in the sense "ice-like" not only implying cold but the solidification of it being frozen. As for example:

mar ikoinu. Icy blood.

The meaning here would be a block of frozen blood, as opposed to koinu imar bloody ice, which would imply some blood staining an ice block. To say that a man has "icy blood" would be an impossibility since that blood would not be able to be pumped.

koinu

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012
IPA: ['kʰoj·nʉ]
n. ice. The solid state of frozen water or any other liquid.

This word is pretty simple and it's much too similar to its English equivalent. As a Tulvan word it can be used with the adjective affix but in the sense "ice-like" not only implying cold but the solidification of it being frozen. As for example:

mar ikoinu. Icy blood.

The meaning here would be a block of frozen blood, as opposed to koinu imar bloody ice, which would imply some blood staining an ice block. To say that a man has "icy blood" would be an impossibility since that blood would not be able to be pumped.

Game of Thrones Season 2 Premiere Event

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Tonight I went to the season 2 cast and crew premiere event for Game of Thrones in LA. It’s a great venue (the Ray Kurtzman Theater at CAA), of course, and a fun time out, but it’s also nice to see people I mainly communicate with via e-mail face to face—though, as usual, I forgot to get pictures. However, you can see Bryan Cogman in this shot:

Last time we saw the first two episodes of season 1; this time we just the first episode of season 2. But…man! These guys do good work. I won’t give anything away, but one thing viewers will notice at the very beginning: Peter Dinklage’s name has moved on up to the east side, as it were (when the first episode airs, compare it to the season 1 intro). Granted, some of the names that were ahead of his aren’t around any longer, but nonetheless, it’s well-deserved!

After the screening was over, there was an after party, and as I was waiting to get my car, I finally had a chance to chat face-to-face with the man himself, khali khali (or perhaps khal khaloa?), zhey Drogo: Jason Momoa.

So, I knew Jason Momoa was buff; we’ve seen that. I don’t think I fully appreciated just how tall he was. Check out this photo:

Me and Jason Momoa.

And hes’ not even standing up tall! Bet that dude could dunk if he put his mind to it. After that one, he said we should make angry, Drogo faces. The result:

Me and Jason Momoa doing angry faces.

It’s an iPhone camera, so we looked at the picture afterwards, and Jason’s exact words were, “Dude, you look constipated!” Yeah… Oops! Truth is, I just couldn’t do an angry face, because I was so floored to be meeting and talking to Lisa Bonet (i.e. Denise). I mean, I grew up with The Cosby Show: That family feels like they’re real to me! I didn’t say anything (after all, every one of the main cast members has heard every comment and question in the world about The Cosby Show ten billion times over), but I couldn’t keep my face from smiling.

At the after party at The Eveleigh, there was legitimate full-course dinner food there, as well as appetizers (which I was grateful for, since I hadn’t eaten much that day). Here’s what I had:

Food I had.

See how red that meat is?! Man, that was good! So that got me to thinking: How would you characterize rare vs. well-done meat in Dothraki? Not an easy question. In my experience, those who live in the Midwest (of America) on farms and actually have a hand in the whole food preparation process only eat well-done meat. Ask for something rare in their presence, and they’ll give you a look like you just stepped out of a chicken. (Think about that one for a minute.)

While the Dothraki are preparing their own meat, I can’t help but think they wouldn’t share this prohibition (I wanted to say superstition, but I’m sure farm people have good reasons for distrusting rare meat [and I'm sure I don't want to know what those reasons are]). After all, they have pregnant women eat a raw horse’s heart which has just been ripped from a live horse’s body—and they think this will help the fetus, as opposed to lead to salmonella, or something. So “raw” probably isn’t the word for it.

Looking over the vocabulary, I already have words that I think will cover one scale—both vegetation and meat:

  • chosh “fresh” ~ rikh “rotten”

This is one scale (the “how likely is this to be bad?” scale), and I think it works fine for meat. So chosh can cover “raw” or “rare”, depending on the circumstance. In addition to this, though, there’s also the heating scale. Given what we see of the Dothraki, it doesn’t seem to me like they’ve invested a lot in slow-cooking or baking: it’s probably burnt or not burnt. Given those two extremes, going by the color of the meat seems like a good way to characterize the meat:

  • virzeth “red” ~ kazga “black”

So if you ever get a Dothraki waiter, you’ve got two options: che gavat virzeth che gavat kazga. And to me it seems likely that, in the world of Dothraki cuisine (to the extent that that phrase even makes sense), it’s not the case that there’s a dish and you decide how “done” you like your meat—rather, there are dishes where the meat will be virzeth, and dishes where the meat will be kazga, and switching them doesn’t make sense (like if you ordered chicken parmigiana and you got steak parmigiana instead of chicken: it’s just a different dish). That’s my read. What do you think? (Actually, I wonder what they’d think over at The Inn at the Crossroads…)

Imperial Messages XII – “… nay ang pragongya panca …”

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

This is the twelfth posting in a series on the process of translating the short story “Eine kaiserliche Botschaft” by the Praguer writer Franz Kafka (*1883, †1924). The individual installments will go through the text mostly sentence by sentence, quoting from the German text as well as a translation of it into English. Following these quotations, I will discuss and comment on newly coined words and thoughts I had on grammar while doing the translation.

The text

This is again a rather long passage, so I’ve split this into four parts, still to be published semi-weekly to stay on schedule. This is the last part of these four.

[…]; und stürzte er endlich aus dem äußersten Tor – aber niemals, niemals kann es geschehen – liegt erst die Residenzstadt vor ihm, die Mitte der Welt, hochgeschüttet voll ihres Bodensatzes. (Kafka 1994, 282:1–4)

[…]; and if he were to burst out at last through the outermost gate – but it can never, never happen – before him still lies the royal capital, the middle of the world, piled high in its sediment. (Kafka 2011)

[…] – nay ang pragongya panca manga agonan kunangyēa pang-vā ikan – nārya amangoyreng tadoy – ang yomongyo tarela ayromitan marin yāy, Terpeng Mavayena, sang nujyos deng idaseri avan sitang-yona.

Interlinear glossing

[…]
[…]
nay
and
ang
AF
prag-ong-ya
tumble-IRR-3SM
panca
finally
manga
MOT
agonan
out_of
kunang-ye-ea
door-PL-LOC
pang-vā
last
ikan
very
nārya
but
amang-oy-reng
happen-NEG-3S.INAN.A
tadoy
never
ang
AF
yoma-ong-yo
exist-IRR-3SN
tarela
still
ayron-mitan
city_residence
marin
in_front_of
yāy,
3SM.LOC,
Terpeng
Middle
Mavay-ena,
World-GEN,
si-ang
REL-A
nuj-yos
pour-3SN.P
deng
full
idas-eri
dirt-INS
avan
bottom
sitang=yona.
self=3SN.GEN.

‘[…]; and if he would finally tumble out of the very last gate – but this will never ever happen – still the residence city, the Center of the World, which has been poured full with its own sediment, would still be in front of him.’

Notes on translation

Words that had to be made here were prag- ‘to tumble’ – which is coincidence and not related to the German name of Kafka’s home town, Prague, since I wanted a word that sounded somehow tumbly to me – and idas ‘dirt’, which I derived from the adjective of the same shape and meaning. Kunangye is also taken to mean ‘gate’ here, not just plainly ‘doors’, which is the definition of kunang that is in the dictionary, to wit, the entry to a house. I’ve translated “die Mitte der Welt” (Kafka 282:3–4) as a title here, “Terpeng Mavayena”, which is used attributively, so that terpeng ‘middle’ is not inflected for case. As for grammar and style, I used a double negation for emphasis in “amangoyreng tadoy”, which I have never done before. However, I think it fits quite well here.

Works cited:
Kafka, Franz. “Eine kaiserliche Botschaft.” Drucke zu Lebzeiten. By Franz Kafka. Eds. Wolf Kittler et al. Frankfurt a. M.: S. Fischer, 1994. 280–82. Print.
———. “A Message from the Emperor.” Trans. by Mark Harman. NYRblog. The New York Review of Books, 1 Jul. 2011. Web. 9 Feb. 2012. ‹http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/jul/01/message-emperor-new-translation›

Trurian word of the day: tureon

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

tureon (imperfective verb): to wear (clothes); to shine (sun).

igärer
today
tenöchí
hat.ACC
angadheí
fancy
​tur​​-éth
wear-3.MASC.SING.PAUS

“he’s wearing an ostentatious hat today”

Originally, the verb tureon meant ‘to expose, bring to light’, but no longer has this general implication . Now it is used to convey the process of wearing (literally ‘displaying’) a certain article of clothing, or the shining (i.e. exposing through light) of the sun.

Emotions

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012
cynwhœd/cynfed/canfad/gwynfud/qanvod noun, angelic/fairy/neutral/human/demon
ecstacy/joy/happiness/pleasure/schadenfreude

paran/baron noun, neutral/demon
sadness/dispair

fyreg/farag/varug noun, fairy/neutral/human
annoyance/anger/hate

tafras/davroz noun, neutral/demon
fear/terror

All the adjective forms follow the usual pattern. Cynfed > cynfydje, farag > farygba, davroz > davryzdo, etc.


Bonus phrase:
Khamag legri nayn... (Legri nayn... for short)
If approve you(fut)...
If you will approve... (i.e. Please...)

Use of Unicode in Kindle Formatting Is Incomplete!

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

Writing this post has certainly clarified my own thinking.  I hope it’s helpful for other people.

By now most of the people reading this post probably know about my problems with using Wingdings symbols from the Symbols drop-down menu of Word Documents.  I used them as link signs in my Shshi conlang and also used a couple of them in
!Ka<tá, my Bird language.  I picked them out in blissful ignorance solely because I liked the way they looked.  They work fine in a Word document and they copy fine to PDF, so they will show perfectly in a printed book.  Any of you who wants to see my languages the way I intended them to look will have to get a copy of the paperback.

Putting the book in Kindle is another matter, however.  An expert in Unicode gave me a lot of much appreciated advice, helping me discover the Character Map in Word.  This can be found at Start/Programs/Accessories/SystemsTools/Character Map.  All the characters listed there in the font Arial Unicode MS should show both in internet postings (as on this blog) and (I hoped) in Kindle.  However, Wingdings aren’t Unicode at all, so I decided to substitute similar characters that are Unicode, as follows:

↳ (U+21B3)  ↻ (U+21BB)  ⇄ (U+21C4)  ⇅ (U+21C5)  ⇞  (U+21DE)

It seemed to work with blog postings (see my sample Chapter 12 on Ruminations of a Remembrancer, where the symbols should show correctly now on all operating systems).  So I prepared a sample post for uploading to Kindle.  Previously I had done a sample upload using the Wingdings.  When you do an upload, you can preview it on a mobi. format (in my case it goes to the MobiPocket Reader), and then you can move it into your Kindle.  In my original upload, the Wingdings showed only as the corresponding alphanumeric characters.  In the sample using the Unicode substitutions, the only character that showed was ↳(U+21B3).  The others all showed as little squares with question marks in them, or in one single case, just a really tiny empty square.

Awhile back I asked Kindle about the Wingdings problem and they replied by sending me a PDF copy of the “Kindle Publishing Guidelines.”  At the end is a list of the Unicode symbols that they accept.  So this morning I did some comparison.  Kindle lists the symbols sorted by the Unicode number, just as the Character Map does.  And of the ones I wanted to use, only ↳ (U+21B3) is present.

Just for curiosity’s sake, I also tested out the Symbols drop-down menu (using Arial Unicode MS [Unicode (hex)]), as well as the Font drop-down menu (Arial Unicode MS).  Both of these got exactly the same result – nothing showed in Kindle except ↳.  But it’s interesting to learn that these two methods seemed to produce Unicode characters.  I haven’t tested yet whether they would work with web postings on all operating systems.

!Ka<tá also uses two arrow symbols (↗↘2197 & 2198) that don’t appear in the “Kindle Publishing Guide,” but since these don’t happen to be used in “The Termite Queen,” I’m ignoring them for the moment.

I have not tested any of this on Smashwords, but they told me they can’t take “symbols”; they will show as question marks.  I don’t know if that includes Unicode.  I’ll probably test it out someday when I have time.

So I would suggest that when anybody is constructing a language, if you want to publish it on Kindle, get a copy of the “Kindle Publishing Guidelines,” be sure you’re familiar with Unicode, and pick only symbols that are in the guidelines.

The best alternative would be if Kindle decided to include all Unicode characters in its font.  And I would really like to see the various Wingdings character sets given Unicode designations.

So whenever I’m able to publish “The Termite Queen” on Kindle, I’m going to use the method outlined on the 2/18/12 post on the termitespeaker blog entitled “I Think I’ve Solved the Wingdings Problem.”  I’ll substitute superscript syllables for the link symbols and explain what I’m doing in a prefatory Author’s Note.  (As for what’s holding up the Kindle publication, the permission to publish Robert Graves quotations in e-book format is still up in the air, but that’s off the point of this post.)

Use of Unicode in Kindle Formatting Is Incomplete!

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012
       Writing this post has certainly clarified my own thinking.  I hope it’s helpful for other people.
       By now most of the people reading this post probably know about my problems with using Wingdings symbols from the Symbols drop-down menu of Word Documents.  I used them as link signs in my Shshi conlang and also used a couple of them in !Ka<tá, my Bird language.  I picked them out in blissful ignorance solely because I liked the way they looked.  They work fine in a Word document and they copy fine to PDF, so they will show perfectly in a printed book.  Any of you who wants to see my languages the way I intended them to look will have to get a copy of the paperback.
       Putting the book in Kindle is another matter, however.  An expert in Unicode gave me a lot of much appreciated advice, helping me discover the Character Map in Word.  This can be found at Start/Programs/Accessories/SystemsTools/Character Map.  All the characters listed there in the font Arial Unicode MS should show both in internet postings (as on this blog) and (I hoped) in Kindle.  However, Wingdings aren’t Unicode at all, so I decided to substitute similar characters that are Unicode, as follows:
↳  U+21B3
↻ U+21BB
⇄ U+21C4
⇅ U+21C5
⇞  U+21DE
       It seemed to work with blog postings (see my sample Chapter 12 on the present blog, where the symbols should show correctly on all operating systems).  So I prepared a sample post for uploading to Kindle.
       Previously I had done a sample upload using the Wingdings.  When you do an upload, you can preview it on a mobi. format (in my case it goes to the MobiPocket Reader), and then you can move it into your Kindle.  In my original upload, the Wingdings showed only as the corresponding alphanumeric characters.  In the sample using the Unicode substitutions, the only character that showed was ↳(U+21B3).  The others all showed as little squares with question marks in them, or in one single case, just a really tiny empty square.
       Awhile back I asked Kindle about the Wingdings problem and they replied by sending me a PDF copy of the “Kindle Publishing Guidelines.”  At the end is a list of the Unicode symbols that they accept.  So this morning I did some comparison.  Kindle lists the symbols sorted by the Unicode number, just as the Character Map does.  And of the ones I wanted to use, only ↳ (U+21B3) is present. 
       Just for curiosity’s sake, I also tested out the Symbols drop-down menu (using Arial Unicode MS [Unicode (hex)]), as well as the Font drop-down menu (Arial Unicode MS).  Both of these got exactly the same result – nothing showed in Kindle except ↳.  But it’s interesting to learn that these two methods seemed to produce Unicode characters.  I haven’t tested yet whether they would work with web postings on all operating systems.
       !Ka<tá also uses two arrow symbols (↗↘2197 & 2198) that don’t appear in the “Kindle Publishing Guide,” but since these don’t happen to be used in “The Termite Queen,” I’m ignoring them for the moment.
       I have not tested any of this on Smashwords, but they told me they can’t take “symbols”; they will show as question marks.  I don’t know if that includes Unicode.  I’ll probably test it out someday when I have time.
       So I would suggest that when anybody is constructing a language, if you want to publish it on Kindle, get a copy of the “Kindle Publishing Guidelines,” be sure you’re familiar with Unicode, and pick only symbols that are in the guidelines.
       The best alternative would be if Kindle decided to include all Unicode characters in its font.  And I would really like to see the various Wingdings character sets given Unicode designations.
       So whenever I’m able to publish “The Termite Queen” on Kindle, I’m going to use the method outlined on the 2/18/12 post on the termitespeaker blog
entitled “I Think I’ve Solved the Wingdings Problem.”  I’ll substitute superscript syllables for the link symbols and explain what I’m doing in a prefatory Author’s Note.  (As for what’s holding up the Kindle publication, the permission to publish Robert Graves quotations in e-book format is still up in the air, but that’s off the point of this post.)

Use of Unicode in Kindle Formatting Is Incomplete!

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012
       Writing this post has certainly clarified my own thinking.  I hope it’s helpful for other people.
       By now most of the people reading this post probably know about my problems with using Wingdings symbols from the Symbols drop-down menu of Word Documents.  I used them as link signs in my Shshi conlang and also used a couple of them in !Ka<tá, my Bird language.  I picked them out in blissful ignorance solely because I liked the way they looked.  They work fine in a Word document and they copy fine to PDF, so they will show perfectly in a printed book.  Any of you who wants to see my languages the way I intended them to look will have to get a copy of the paperback.
       Putting the book in Kindle is another matter, however.  An expert in Unicode gave me a lot of much appreciated advice, helping me discover the Character Map in Word.  This can be found at Start/Programs/Accessories/SystemsTools/Character Map.  All the characters listed there in the font Arial Unicode MS should show both in internet postings (as on this blog) and (I hoped) in Kindle.  However, Wingdings aren’t Unicode at all, so I decided to substitute similar characters that are Unicode, as follows:
↳  U+21B3
↻ U+21BB
⇄ U+21C4
⇅ U+21C5
⇞  U+21DE
       It seemed to work with blog postings (see my sample Chapter 12 on the present blog, where the symbols should show correctly on all operating systems).  So I prepared a sample post for uploading to Kindle.
       Previously I had done a sample upload using the Wingdings.  When you do an upload, you can preview it on a mobi. format (in my case it goes to the MobiPocket Reader), and then you can move it into your Kindle.  In my original upload, the Wingdings showed only as the corresponding alphanumeric characters.  In the sample using the Unicode substitutions, the only character that showed was ↳(U+21B3).  The others all showed as little squares with question marks in them, or in one single case, just a really tiny empty square.
       Awhile back I asked Kindle about the Wingdings problem and they replied by sending me a PDF copy of the “Kindle Publishing Guidelines.”  At the end is a list of the Unicode symbols that they accept.  So this morning I did some comparison.  Kindle lists the symbols sorted by the Unicode number, just as the Character Map does.  And of the ones I wanted to use, only ↳ (U+21B3) is present. 
       Just for curiosity’s sake, I also tested out the Symbols drop-down menu (using Arial Unicode MS [Unicode (hex)]), as well as the Font drop-down menu (Arial Unicode MS).  Both of these got exactly the same result – nothing showed in Kindle except ↳.  But it’s interesting to learn that these two methods seemed to produce Unicode characters.  I haven’t tested yet whether they would work with web postings on all operating systems.
       !Ka<tá also uses two arrow symbols (↗↘2197 & 2198) that don’t appear in the “Kindle Publishing Guide,” but since these don’t happen to be used in “The Termite Queen,” I’m ignoring them for the moment.
       I have not tested any of this on Smashwords, but they told me they can’t take “symbols”; they will show as question marks.  I don’t know if that includes Unicode.  I’ll probably test it out someday when I have time.
       So I would suggest that when anybody is constructing a language, if you want to publish it on Kindle, get a copy of the “Kindle Publishing Guidelines,” be sure you’re familiar with Unicode, and pick only symbols that are in the guidelines.
       The best alternative would be if Kindle decided to include all Unicode characters in its font.  And I would really like to see the various Wingdings character sets given Unicode designations.
       So whenever I’m able to publish “The Termite Queen” on Kindle, I’m going to use the method outlined on the 2/18/12 post on the termitespeaker blog
entitled “I Think I’ve Solved the Wingdings Problem.”  I’ll substitute superscript syllables for the link symbols and explain what I’m doing in a prefatory Author’s Note.  (As for what’s holding up the Kindle publication, the permission to publish Robert Graves quotations in e-book format is still up in the air, but that’s off the point of this post.)