Archive for September, 2012

your (plural) is teuden

Sunday, September 30th, 2012
teuden = your (plural) (possessive pronoun) (some things Google found for "teuden": an unusual to rare term; user names; a rare last name; name of a World of Warcraft character; similar Teufen is the name of a places in Switzerland and Germany)

Word derivation for "your" (plural) :
Basque = zuen, Finnish = teidan + -nne
Miresua = teuden

I need to deal with the letters I have in the Basque and the Finnish words. My possessive pronouns in Miresua are inescapably somewhat irregular.

Kriani baahl hamar aww

Sunday, September 30th, 2012
I had a rather musical childhood, and for that am eternally grateful to both my parents and my environment in general.  I have a song for about every mood!  Sometimes they appear to me unexpectedly even when I haven't heard or thought about them in a long while- that's the case with this particular one.

"May the circle be open" is a common parting-song at paganish gatherings, and is sung while moving counterclockwise along the circle-area which is used for workings.  Sometimes people sing it just by itself, though- which is what I started spontaneously doing at work the other evening. :)  Being that I am who I am, of course this song was Sandicified.

Would you like to hear it (quite horribly) sung?

Order of texts: Sandic - English of Sandic


*

Kriani baahl hamar aŵ,
iné uxtiaktai
he deya aŵ pa rave pé obaahl

lēain aŵtúraj
lēain iné aŵféd
iné lēain ejj aŵtúraj

---

Our circle is whole/full
behold it is knitted together
may the peace of our honored one be in your heart

happily we meet
behold happily we depart
behold happily we meet again.

---

A note on the translation:
The first two lines in English in the original are "May the circle be open but unbroken".  I translated this as "Our circle is whole/full, it is knitted together."  Why?  I liked the imagery for that better, and no one else but me is likely to ever sing this song in Sandic. :D

To be more accurate, though, and supposing someone wanted something truer to the original English, one could also say "Kriani baahl hamar aŵ, gator utepéti", "our circle is whole/complete, and will never be broken".  This also fits the melody of the song.

The third line, "he deya aŵ pa rave pé obaahl", "May the peace of our honored one be in your heart" is rendered in the original English as "may the peace of the god(dess) be ever in your heart".  Being that some people I know don't have gods or goddesses as the central part of their practice (myself included), I figured "honored one(s)" to be a good compromise.

Again, if one would want to be more faithful to the original English, one could say "he jwia aŵ" (the peace of our goddess) or "he jwr aŵ" (the peace of our god), or even "he jwran aŵ" (the peace of our gods).  As an added bonus, "he lēiakéman aŵ" (the peace of our ancestors) also fits in that spot. :D



*from here.

Conlang Relay Nineteen: Some Final Observations

Saturday, September 29th, 2012
Habot is the word for rock or stone.  The plural is botí, which makes the stem bot with different affixes for the singular and plural.  It is also the word for milestone, and by extension the word for mile, the measured distance between stones.

Bena, mountain, is a feminine noun.  The genitive is benas.  After a verb of motion the indirect object is the accusative benan, otherwise bena is used for the indirect object as well.

This language has three gramatical genders: masculine, feminine and neuter.  Masculine nouns are usually unmarked after the stem.  Feminine nouns end in -a, neuter nouns in -on.  The plural endings are -í, -e, and -a.  There are other plural endings that have slipped into the language like the marker -ga.  Nouns and adjectives agree for endings in gender, number and case.

I have used surut, stream, to translate river, and ríon, brook, to translate valley as I don't have these words yet.  This would mean that ríon has the extended meaning of a watercourse that may be dry for part of its time.

Shradye means 'heart, emotional organ', different from heart, physical organ which pumps blood.  The phrase for 'sad' literally means 'troubled heart'.  The construction is repeated in the final quote as a balance.  Shradye is a feminine noun with a soft ending.

There are two stems for the word 'be at, be here': âya for inanimates like rocks, and íya for people and animals.

The associative preposition has different forms.  If it governs a masculine or neuter noun it is ya or a.  If it governs a masculine or neuter noun in an indirect clause after another preposition it is ye or e.  This form is also used before plural nouns.  If the noun is feminine it is or í.  The y is dropped if the word before it ends in a consonant.  In context it can mean 'and' or 'with'.  It can join verbs together as an infinitive marker.  It cannot join clauses.  In that case the conjunction dok is used.

Lé jebé – The body

Friday, September 28th, 2012
I spent some time doodling on the porch today, and spontaneously came up with a body-parts sheet.


I am proud of myself. Of these, I only had to look up three of them.

Amusingly, "anen", the word for mouth, was remembered in my head as "anenab" because of a song that I translated not too long ago, "aal iz well". The word for mouth otherwise has been very rarely used, so it was the accusative form (from the phrase "anenab opeemajten", "open your mouth") which sprang to mind.

I wonder why the picture came out so small?  If I have time later, I will upload a more better-er one or just type out a list of what's there.


Also, continuing my recent prayer flag kick, I have over the past few days graduated to cloth flags. :)
These below read (top first, then bottom, left to right):
"lēaactab, damdabin, kunkabin, 
éwúb ân gre, safpab."
"Happiness, food, companions,
patience, shelter."

Pursuing a Theme: My Review of Simon Gough’s The White Goddess

Friday, September 28th, 2012

       A couple of days ago, I posted a review of The White Goddess: An Encounter by Simon Gough on my Ruminations blog.  I mentioned that the subject matched up well with my intentions for this present blog -- that is, to comment on the subject of myth in literature.  The review was getting pretty long and so I left out a couple of things.  I would like to remark on those here and also to talk a little about Graves' poetry and how reading Simon Gough's book has impacted my perception of it, and also touch briefly on Dylan Thomas.

       First, my omissions from the review.  I didn't talk about the role of Robert Graves' son Juan, who plays such a noticeable part in the first section of the book.  He is a bit of a Wild Child -- a mischievous faun who doesn't take to the constraints of civilization. He helps Simon lose a lot of his civilized inhibitions.  And yet when we see him again, at the age of perhaps 16, he has become an introverted youth who plays hardly any part in the story.  One can only assume that going off to school has crushed his spirit.  A couple of remarks are made about how he, too, is in love with Margot and about how he is a disappointment to his father, but that's as far as it goes.  I was a bit disappointed, too.  However, this isn't Juan's story and since it's based on actual events, the author can't change some realities.  Juan simply had no role to play in the latter two-thirds of the book.
       It's a greater oversight for me to have omitted a discussion of Beryl, Robert Graves' wife.  She is the steadying influence, the centerpost of the household, which would fall apart without her.  She is the Wise Woman, herself an aspect of the Goddess -- the Mother or Earth Goddess -- Demeter -- who is eternal.  Graves' relationship with her is enigmatic -- she can't be his muse, yet he can father children on her and he couldn't live without her.  By 1989 the King-God may have yielded to the new king and left the scene, but Beryl still remains.  What endures in Paradise is the Mother, not the Muse -- a more profound dimension  of the female principle, but not one who is inspirational for poets, it seems.

       Now to the subject of poetry.  At one point in the book this exchange takes place:

       "Beryl looked away, shaking her head, not at me but at her thoughts.  'What makes it even worse is that we're in October now,' she sighed.
       " 'October?'
       " 'It's the worst month for poets -- for true poets, at least! October's the month of death, of human sacrifice -- ' She suddenly grinned at my expression.  'It doesn't matter what you or I think, it's what Robert believes -- that's the thing.' "

       I was struck by this because, in picking the chapter epigraphs for my book The Termite Queen, I used two poems related to October: "Especially When the October Wind" by Dylan Thomas, and Robert Graves' own "Intercession in Late October."

       "Especially When the October Wind" is a 32-line poem on the dual themes of the urgency of poetry and death, a sinewy weave of imagery of words, weather, landscape, blood, heartbeat, the "dark bird," and in effect Graves' Goddess ("the wordy shapes of women").  It even has some of Graves' trees from his own White Goddess (the "vowelled beeches," the "oaken voices").  In one of my epigraph posts in Ruminations, I discussed some of the excerpts from this poem that I used as epigraphs on the chapters where Kaitrin and Kwi'ga'ga'tei are learning how to communicate.   Personally, I think this is one of Thomas's great poems because the progession of the imagery is so controlled.  Sometimes Thomas can seem wildly out of control, but not here.
       So it's interesting to note that Thomas was born in October.  For that reason alone he might connect the month with a sense of his own mortality, but Beryl's remark quoted above made the connection all the more meaningful.  Robert Graves was born in July, so he can't make that connection; for him the connection is one of the dying of the year, the time when the King is sacrified so that a new year can be born.
 
       "Intercession in Late October" is short.  I own a copy of Graves' Collected Poems, 1975, but I just discovered he didn't include "Intercession in Late October" there; I copied it from a library copy of the 1961 collection, so he had written it by the period being portrayed in Gough's book.  I'm going to quote it here.
 
How hard the year dies: No frost yet.
On drifts of yellow sand Midas reclines,
Fearless of moaning reed or sullen wave.
Firm and fragrant still the brambleberries.
On ivy blooms butterflies wag.
 
Spare him a little longer, Crone,
For his clean hands and love-submissive heart.
 
       According to Graves' Greek Myths, Midas is one of the King-figures who is doomed to die at the end of the year.  He was cursed with ass's ears and was ashamed, so he hid them under a cap.  However, his barber knew the truth and found the secret too good to keep, so he dug a hole on the river bank and whispered into it, "Midas has ass's ears!"  Then he filled in the hole and went away.  A reed grew in that place and whispered the secret to everyone who passed by (the "moaning reed").  When Midas learned that his secret was out, he executed the barber, drank bull's blood, and "perished miserably," as Grave concludes. ("Because of the great magical potency of bull's blood, only the Earth-mother could drink it without harm," Graves writes.  So it makes a terrific weapon for the Goddess to use to slay her Kings.)  
       Originally I saw this as a single-dimension poem, talking about the end of the year as symbolized by the dying King, but after reading Gough's book, I see it a little differently.  I see Midas as the betrayed Goddess-loving King who is innocent of any real evil-doing and yet will ultimately be done in by the Goddess, anyway.  I see Graves identifying with Midas -- one who can't escape the ultimate betrayal, but yet begs his muse to spare him for a little longer. 
       I've long known Graves' poetry was about the female principle, but now I'll always be looking for parallels between the figures in his poetry and how he felt about his muses, which I think will deepen my understanding.  And I think it's an intriguing -- can we call it a coincidence? -- that another "true poet," Dylan Thomas, should also have written about October as the month of the death of life and poetry.
 


Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Four

Friday, September 28th, 2012
Last paragraph:

Nidolgon poslí merega, luk ve dâyet lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve seft nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint títíg haní, títíg bishí, ye títíg dúdwan.”
Premye habot ve kashte “Na'dâ wolenshim bina ten.”
Tal ve bonte, “Nas shradyega budet shaten nipana.”

Nidolgon poslí merega, luk ve dâyet lúb a kashte:
A long time after some days, the mouse came back and said:
locative.long-time after day.plural mouse.nominative non-present come.past return associative say.past

“Bodú ve seft nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint títíg haní, títíg bishí, ye títíg dúdwan.”
"I went beyond the mountain, and I saw the same grasses, the same seeds, and the same insects."
1s non-present gone.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past demonstrative-plural.same-plural grass.plural demonstrative-plural.same-plural seed.plural associative demonstrative-plural.same-plural insect.plural

Premye habot ve kashte “Na'dâ wolenshim bina ten.”
The first rock said, "We don't want to see that."
first rock non-present say 1p.here want.present.plural.negative see.infinitive demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte, “Nas shradyega budet shaten nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be happy forever."
other non-present answer.past our.plural heart.plural will-be.present happy locative.ever

Good night

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Four

Friday, September 28th, 2012
Last paragraph:

Nidolgon poslí merega, luk ve dâyet lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve seft nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint títíg haní, títíg bishí, ye títíg dúdwan.”
Premye habot ve kashte “Na'dâ wolenshim bina ten.”
Tal ve bonte, “Nas shradyega budet shaten nipana.”

Nidolgon poslí merega, luk ve dâyet lúb a kashte:
A long time after some days, the mouse came back and said:
locative.long-time after day.plural mouse.nominative non-present come.past return associative say.past

“Bodú ve seft nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint títíg haní, títíg bishí, ye títíg dúdwan.”
"I went beyond the mountain, and I saw the same grasses, the same seeds, and the same insects."
1s non-present gone.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past demonstrative-plural.same-plural grass.plural demonstrative-plural.same-plural seed.plural associative demonstrative-plural.same-plural insect.plural

Premye habot ve kashte “Na'dâ wolenshim bina ten.”
The first rock said, "We don't want to see that."
first rock non-present say 1p.here want.present.plural.negative see.infinitive demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte, “Nas shradyega budet shaten nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be happy forever."
other non-present answer.past our.plural heart.plural will-be.present happy locative.ever

Good night

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Four

Friday, September 28th, 2012
Last paragraph:

Nidolgon poslí merega, luk ve dâyet lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve seft nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint títíg haní, títíg bishí, ye títíg dúdwan.”
Premye habot ve kashte “Na'dâ wolenshim bina ten.”
Tal ve bonte, “Nas shradyega budet shaten nipana.”

Nidolgon poslí merega, luk ve dâyet lúb a kashte:
A long time after some days, the mouse came back and said:
locative.long-time after day.plural mouse.nominative non-present come.past return associative say.past

“Bodú ve seft nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint títíg haní, títíg bishí, ye títíg dúdwan.”
"I went beyond the mountain, and I saw the same grasses, the same seeds, and the same insects."
1s non-present gone.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past demonstrative-plural.same-plural grass.plural demonstrative-plural.same-plural seed.plural associative demonstrative-plural.same-plural insect.plural

Premye habot ve kashte “Na'dâ wolenshim bina ten.”
The first rock said, "We don't want to see that."
first rock non-present say 1p.here want.present.plural.negative see.infinitive demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte, “Nas shradyega budet shaten nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be happy forever."
other non-present answer.past our.plural heart.plural will-be.present happy locative.ever

Good night

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Three

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
Back again, thanks for waiting.  While I've got time before Doc Who and the Last Gunslinger I can post another paragraph.

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra.
Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
Soon after a time the bird flew back and said:
soon after time.genitive bird.nominative non-present fly.past return associative said.past

“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra."
I flew beyond the mountain, and I saw broad streams, green brooks and tall trees.
1s non-present fly.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past broad.masculine.plural stream.masculine.plural, green.neuter.plural brook.neuter.plural associative tall.neuter.plural tree.neuter.plural

"Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
The first rock said, "Perhaps we could see that."
first rock.singular non-present say.past perhaps relative 1p.here non-present conditional.see.past demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be unhappy forever."
other non-present answer.past 1p.possessive.plural heart.plural future-be troublesome locative-ever

Have a good evening.

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Three

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
Back again, thanks for waiting.  While I've got time before Doc Who and the Last Gunslinger I can post another paragraph.

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra.
Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
Soon after a time the bird flew back and said:
soon after time.genitive bird.nominative non-present fly.past return associative said.past

“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra."
I flew beyond the mountain, and I saw broad streams, green brooks and tall trees.
1s non-present fly.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past broad.masculine.plural stream.masculine.plural, green.neuter.plural brook.neuter.plural associative tall.neuter.plural tree.neuter.plural

"Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
The first rock said, "Perhaps we could see that."
first rock.singular non-present say.past perhaps relative 1p.here non-present conditional.see.past demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be unhappy forever."
other non-present answer.past 1p.possessive.plural heart.plural future-be troublesome locative-ever

Have a good evening.