Archive for September, 2012

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Three

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
Back again, thanks for waiting.  While I've got time before Doc Who and the Last Gunslinger I can post another paragraph.

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra.
Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
Soon after a time the bird flew back and said:
soon after time.genitive bird.nominative non-present fly.past return associative said.past

“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra."
I flew beyond the mountain, and I saw broad streams, green brooks and tall trees.
1s non-present fly.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past broad.masculine.plural stream.masculine.plural, green.neuter.plural brook.neuter.plural associative tall.neuter.plural tree.neuter.plural

"Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
The first rock said, "Perhaps we could see that."
first rock.singular non-present say.past perhaps relative 1p.here non-present conditional.see.past demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be unhappy forever."
other non-present answer.past 1p.possessive.plural heart.plural future-be troublesome locative-ever

Have a good evening.

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Three

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
Back again, thanks for waiting.  While I've got time before Doc Who and the Last Gunslinger I can post another paragraph.

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra.
Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
Soon after a time the bird flew back and said:
soon after time.genitive bird.nominative non-present fly.past return associative said.past

“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra."
I flew beyond the mountain, and I saw broad streams, green brooks and tall trees.
1s non-present fly.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past broad.masculine.plural stream.masculine.plural, green.neuter.plural brook.neuter.plural associative tall.neuter.plural tree.neuter.plural

"Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
The first rock said, "Perhaps we could see that."
first rock.singular non-present say.past perhaps relative 1p.here non-present conditional.see.past demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be unhappy forever."
other non-present answer.past 1p.possessive.plural heart.plural future-be troublesome locative-ever

Have a good evening.

Conlang Relay Nineteen Paragraph Three

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
Back again, thanks for waiting.  While I've got time before Doc Who and the Last Gunslinger I can post another paragraph.

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra.
Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”

Pet poslí kata deng ve plogete lúb a kashte:
Soon after a time the bird flew back and said:
soon after time.genitive bird.nominative non-present fly.past return associative said.past

“Bodú ve ploget nisha benan, dok bodú ve bint bradí surutí, wôda ría ye aotoka dradra."
I flew beyond the mountain, and I saw broad streams, green brooks and tall trees.
1s non-present fly.past locative.beyond mountain.accusative, then 1s non-present see.past broad.masculine.plural stream.masculine.plural, green.neuter.plural brook.neuter.plural associative tall.neuter.plural tree.neuter.plural

"Premye habot ve kashte “Magarí kem na'dâ ve gabinten ten.”
The first rock said, "Perhaps we could see that."
first rock.singular non-present say.past perhaps relative 1p.here non-present conditional.see.past demonstrative.neuter

Tal ve bonte “Nas shradyega budet sús nipana.”
The other answered, "Our hearts will be unhappy forever."
other non-present answer.past 1p.possessive.plural heart.plural future-be troublesome locative-ever

Have a good evening.

you (plural) is teu (revisited)

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012
teu = you (plural) (pronoun - 2nd person plural) (some things Google found for "teu": a very common term; an unusual last name; a rare first name; TEU is the NYSE stock symbol for Box Ships Inc; TEU is an acronym for twenty-foot equivalent unit which a measure used for capacity in container transportation; TEU is an acronym for Tertiary Education Union of New Zealand; TEU is an acronym for Treaty on European Union; in Catalan, Galician and Portuguese teu means "your, yours" (singular))

Word derivation for "you" (plural) :
Basque = zuek, Finnish = te
Miresua = teu

My previous Miresua conlang word for you (plural) was tek. Lately seems I've been doing a step backward for each step forward.

6 Key Phrases for Testing/Creating Your Conlang

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012
He doesn't want dem apples.
I got some cool ideas last week from Tim Ferriss. For any readers who haven't heard of him, look him up - he is an amazing guy who likes to find ways to beat the game, rather than play the game. I was watching this video and I wondered if I could apply any of his ideas to conlanging. Hestarts talking at the 6:35 mark about learning languages and he mentioned that using the following phrases helped one better understand the grammar and mechanics of a language (10:02 mark):

The apple is red.

It is John's apple.

I give John the apple.

We want to give him the apple.

He gives it to John.

She gives it to him.

I thought that it makes sense that the reverse must be true as well - that you should be able to use these as a way of testing out/creating the grammar and mechanics of your conlang! I wanted to try this out in a couple of simple ways to illustrate the concept, but we'll just do one per post.

First, let's use the "English as a conlang" concept I used once before.
Phonology: b, d, g, k, l, v, z, th (as in "the"), zh (as in "mirage"), w, ee, ay, aw, o, oo.
Morphology: (VC)CVC(I) (V=vowel C=consonant I=inflection, and parentheses means "optional") for nouns, verbs, and adjectives; (V)V(C) for everything else.
Syntax & grammar: OSV (Yoda syntax). Inflection is -ee: future tense (will be doing), -ay:  plural , -aw: descriptive/adjective, -o: past tense (was doing), -oo: present tense (is doing).
Vocabulary: the = ayth, apple = awbbul, red = wayd, John = Zhawn, give = geev, want = wawn, I = Eeawt, we = eezh, he = eeoz, him = ayoz, she = eeov, her = ayov. Is/be doesn't work in this morphology so I'm changing it to "bawz."

Red the apple is-being. = Waydaw ayth awbbul bawzoo. (add the -aw inflection to make red/wayd an adjective)
John's apple it is-being. = Zhawnaw awbbul eed bawzoo. (Rather than using apostrophe s to connote ownership as in English, John's name becomes an adjective here)
The apple to John I am-giving. = Ayth awbbul od Zhawn Eeawt geevoo. (I becomes Eeawt - pronounced like "yacht")
The apple to him we are-wanting to be-giving. = Ayth awbbul od ayoz eezh wanaw geevay. ("want to give" is shown by the current tense wanting and future tense giving)
It to John he is-giving. = Eed od Zhawn eeoz geevoo.
It to him she is-giving. = Eed od ayoz eeov geevoo.

As I was generating these translations I learned things. For example, I originally made the morphology (C)V(V) for everything else, but realized that with the inflections I noted, the last vowel of every word becomes important. So I reversed it to make the rest of it work. Look out for things like this as you test your conlang rules with these phrases.

And now you're a Four Hour Conlanger.

6 Key Phrases for Testing/Creating Your Conlang

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012
He doesn't want dem apples.
I got some cool ideas last week from Tim Ferriss. For any readers who haven't heard of him, look him up - he is an amazing guy who likes to find ways to beat the game, rather than play the game. I was watching this video and I wondered if I could apply any of his ideas to conlanging. Hestarts talking at the 6:35 mark about learning languages and he mentioned that using the following phrases helped one better understand the grammar and mechanics of a language (10:02 mark):

The apple is red.

It is John's apple.

I give John the apple.

We want to give him the apple.

He gives it to John.

She gives it to him.

I thought that it makes sense that the reverse must be true as well - that you should be able to use these as a way of testing out/creating the grammar and mechanics of your conlang! I wanted to try this out in a couple of simple ways to illustrate the concept, but we'll just do one per post.

First, let's use the "English as a conlang" concept I used once before.
Phonology: b, d, g, k, l, v, z, th (as in "the"), zh (as in "mirage"), w, ee, ay, aw, o, oo.
Morphology: (VC)CVC(I) (V=vowel C=consonant I=inflection, and parentheses means "optional") for nouns, verbs, and adjectives; (V)V(C) for everything else.
Syntax & grammar: OSV (Yoda syntax). Inflection is -ee: future tense (will be doing), -ay:  plural , -aw: descriptive/adjective, -o: past tense (was doing), -oo: present tense (is doing).
Vocabulary: the = ayth, apple = awbbul, red = wayd, John = Zhawn, give = geev, want = wawn, I = Eeawt, we = eezh, he = eeoz, him = ayoz, she = eeov, her = ayov. Is/be doesn't work in this morphology so I'm changing it to "bawz."

Red the apple is-being. = Waydaw ayth awbbul bawzoo. (add the -aw inflection to make red/wayd an adjective)
John's apple it is-being. = Zhawnaw awbbul eed bawzoo. (Rather than using apostrophe s to connote ownership as in English, John's name becomes an adjective here)
The apple to John I am-giving. = Ayth awbbul od Zhawn Eeawt geevoo. (I becomes Eeawt - pronounced like "yacht")
The apple to him we are-wanting to be-giving. = Ayth awbbul od ayoz eezh wanaw geevay. ("want to give" is shown by the current tense wanting and future tense giving)
It to John he is-giving. = Eed od Zhawn eeoz geevoo.
It to him she is-giving. = Eed od ayoz eeov geevoo.

As I was generating these translations I learned things. For example, I originally made the morphology (C)V(V) for everything else, but realized that with the inflections I noted, the last vowel of every word becomes important. So I reversed it to make the rest of it work. Look out for things like this as you test your conlang rules with these phrases.

And now you're a Four Hour Conlanger.

The flying prayer flag.

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012
A detail from the prayer flag- "Jwrian", "to god".
(Read bottom to top.)

:]  I did some porch sitting today and ended up stringing the prayer flag up.  It didn't want to fly straight for some reason.  I should learn to make better ones (perhaps on fabric in the future?).

Here you go.

I was sprawled out on the porch on a blanket, taking video from below it.  Enjoy.




A different view, later in the day:


Lēithad

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012
During the day, I work in a drive-thru.  I often get bored and end up doodling on things.  A large number of the conlang syntax test questions, for example, have been translated there.  Today I got bored and once again found myself scribbling on some things.  The results are below.


A prayer flag. "Jwrian skra amalan ba felē ykaja."
"I thank God for its inspirations."

I plan to fly this tomorrow, if the weather is nice. :)  Perhaps I will take a video to share.

A reminder mark. "Lēithad."
"Costume / Distraction / Nonreality."

I plan to get this tattooed in this spot, actually.  "Lēithad" reminds that what one sees and experiences is not direct reality.  Day-to-day life is a distraction.  One must focus on the true goals and true tasks in life, not the petty interpersonal conflicts one encounters.

our is geiren

Monday, September 24th, 2012
geiren = our (possessive pronoun) (some things Google found for "geiren": an uncommon to rare term; a rare last name; a very rare first name; user names; name of a World of Warcraft character; name of a place in Norway)

Word derivation for "our" :
Basque = gure, Finnish = meidän + -mme
Miresua = geiren

In Finnish, -mme is a possessive suffix appended to the main word owned, which is used used with or without the genitive meidän.

I considered making this word gemen, to use an M from Finnish, but that would have made my possessive pronouns even more irregular. M will appear in the ending for most 1st person plural verb conjugations.

More Conlangery

Monday, September 24th, 2012

David Peterson is stepping in as a temporary cohost for the Conlangery podcast while regular cohost William Annis is out. The first such episode is out, and you can listen to it here.