Archive for December, 2012

2012: The Year in Conlanging

Monday, December 31st, 2012

It seemed to me that there was a flurry of conlang-related activity during the latter part of 2012, so I decided to take a look back and see if any other significant events in conlangs and conlanging took place this past year. Turns out, there were quite a few. I’m sure I forgot any number. Feel free to add others as comments to this post.

Enjoy the list and happy conlanging in 2013!

31 Days of Lexember

Monday, December 31st, 2012
Well, we have reached the end of Lexember and the end of 2012. I actually completed this month long challenge, albeit with some early and some belated entries. These were not the only words created in December. The total number of entries in the Revised Revised Lexicon grew to 655.
  1. Urad Hristi, Christmas
  2. nashín, meal
  3. gitcea, noon. git, middle, center.
  4. tath, root. pwentath, ginger
  5. cevek, deer
  6. umo, bear (the animal)
  7. bron, to be tired (with ca); to be bored (with sa
  8. sashín, candy
  9. hula, circle
  10. ka'encel, depressed. ka'encelva, depression.
  11. nanal, to study, in the sense of learning something academic, what you do to prepare for an exam.
  12. suthol, to study something to learn about it, research, "do a science"
  13. gwisa, ice. gwisha, frost
  14. vegaviozh, truck
  15. kis, to be named. kisa, name.
  16. yun, to be brave (with ma), to explore (with ka)
  17. col, milk
  18. lemyan, river
  19. drus, meat, flesh, muscle. siru, organ, organ meat. sirurí, guts, internal organs (collectively)
  20. hin, cloud
  21. badh, cow
  22. zopa, sheep
  23. zhwes, goat
  24. peya, chicken.
  25. thes, to dance (with ka)
  26. grayu, raven. gawa, crow
  27. hom (with sa), to think. homa, thought or idea. homsiru, brain.
  28. hlet, to lead (with fa), to persuade (with ca).In the "in charge" sense.
  29. byu, after (in a sequence of physical objects), following (adj)
  30. joa, to save or rescue (with sa). joava, rescue or salvation
  31. pie, to jump (with ka). ropie, to leap up (ka), to pounce upon (ta)

31 Days of Lexember

Monday, December 31st, 2012
Well, we have reached the end of Lexember and the end of 2012. I actually completed this month long challenge, albeit with some early and some belated entries. These were not the only words created in December. The total number of entries in the Revised Revised Lexicon grew to 655.
  1. Urad Hristi, Christmas
  2. nashín, meal
  3. gitcea, noon. git, middle, center.
  4. tath, root. pwentath, ginger
  5. cevek, deer
  6. umo, bear (the animal)
  7. bron, to be tired (with ca); to be bored (with sa
  8. sashín, candy
  9. hula, circle
  10. ka'encel, depressed. ka'encelva, depression.
  11. nanal, to study, in the sense of learning something academic, what you do to prepare for an exam.
  12. suthol, to study something to learn about it, research, "do a science"
  13. gwisa, ice. gwisha, frost
  14. vegaviozh, truck
  15. kis, to be named. kisa, name.
  16. yun, to be brave (with ma), to explore (with ka)
  17. col, milk
  18. lemyan, river
  19. drus, meat, flesh, muscle. siru, organ, organ meat. sirurí, guts, internal organs (collectively)
  20. hin, cloud
  21. badh, cow
  22. zopa, sheep
  23. zhwes, goat
  24. peya, chicken.
  25. thes, to dance (with ka)
  26. grayu, raven. gawa, crow
  27. hom (with sa), to think. homa, thought or idea. homsiru, brain.
  28. hlet, to lead (with fa), to persuade (with ca).In the "in charge" sense.
  29. byu, after (in a sequence of physical objects), following (adj)
  30. joa, to save or rescue (with sa). joava, rescue or salvation
  31. pie, to jump (with ka). ropie, to leap up (ka), to pounce upon (ta)

gireehettuʔmiiwu

Monday, December 31st, 2012

A month full of #Lexember words is coming to an end, with a Tsemehkiooni word suitable for the last night of the year:

gireehettuʔmiiwu (n.) ‘stars’

Rudmooʔma, šaʔweenak gireehettuʔmiiwu!
ru-dmooʔ-ma š-aʔw-eena-k g-ireeh-ettu-Ø-ʔmiiw-u
2SG>3.IRR-watch-OPT, 3i.EVENT-intensively-shine-MOM 1pi>3.EVENT-up_high-at_night-move-by_looking-PL
you-would-want-to-watch, they-shine-brightly-now we-look-up-to-them-at-night
“Look, the stars are shining brightly now!”

Like many other Tsemehkiooni ‘nouns’, gireehettuʔmiiwu is actually an inflected verb. The literal meaning is ‘we look up to them at night’, and the word can be decomposed as follows:

  • g- is a transitive eventive pronominal prefix which indicates that the subject of the verb is first person plural inclusive, and that the object of the verb is a non-human third person participant.
  • -ireeh- is a directional prefix with the meaning ‘up to a considerable height’.
  • -ettu- is a theme prefix indicating that the verb describes something that happens at night or involves darkness in some other way.
  • -Ø- (i.e. nothing) is a phonologically empty verb root that refers to movement.
  • -ʔmiiw- is a manner suffix with the meaning ‘by looking, by observing’. In combination with the empty verb root for movement, this suffix serves as the basic stem for verbs of volitional acts of watching that involve focusing the eyes on a particular target.
  • -u- is a suffix indicating that the verb has a plural object. (Incidentally, the word would be the same if the object was singular: Tsemehkiooni words may not end in the semivowel /w/, and so an epenthetic vowel /u/ would have to be appended if no other suffix was present after -ʔmiiw-.)

Conlangery SHORTS #03: Expanding your Lexemes

Monday, December 31st, 2012
William tells us how lexemes need not be one continuous word or morpheme, using his characteristically exotic examples (and some not so exotic. Top of Show Greeting: fangait Links and Resources: Navajo Verb Template Asheninca Campa

realize (become aware of) is tontaju

Monday, December 31st, 2012
tontaju = realize (verb) (some things Google found for "tontaju": a very rare term; bad OCR of old newspaper texts; somewhat similar tonta means "a fool" or "stupid, silly, foolish" (feminine form) in Italian and Spanish; similar Tontayu is the name of a place on Sulawesi in Indonesia)

Word derivation for "realize (become aware of)":
Basque = konturatu, Finnish = tajuta
Miresua = tontaju

This word isn't in paragraph three of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Although the phrase "it flashed across her mind" could be paraphrased as (or translated as) "she realized".

fųįdi

Sunday, December 30th, 2012

Today’s word of the day for #Lexember is from Omari:

fųįdi (n.) ‘songbird’

Še rįgieteššǫų vųįdi fammoate suojo?
šê rin-<giet.>-°ššǫų‘ ‘-fųįdi-Ø fên-°moate Ø-suojo-Ø
Q 2SG>3.NP-<voice>-hear PL.A-songbird-DIR REL>3-praise SG.A-daylight-DIR
“Can you hear the songbirds welcoming the daylight?”


Facebook Page for Amerysk Conlang (and others)

Sunday, December 30th, 2012
Recently I started a Facebook page and a blog for Amerysk, a 1978 conlang I discovered through my friend Oak (the ORIGINAL Oak). I thought I'd share the experience for those doing likewise for their own favorite conlangs. (Doing likewise=starting Facebook page, not hanging out with the Original Oak.)

The first thing I did after starting Amerysk - A Lost Language (Facebook page) is that I clicked the little thingy in the upper right side of the screen and selected to use Facebook as Amerysk - A Lost Language.

Then I started looking for pages to like as Amerysk. I picked out pages dedicated to other conlangs and auxlangs. I got a lot for Esperanto and Volapük, a couple from Interlingua and then searched 'conlang'. I got a couple of pages people put up for their conlangs who wisely put '(conlang)' as part of their page title.

I might have done likewise but for one reason. The creator of Amerysk was a follower of the Asatru (Odinist, Norse Pagan) religion --- as was Oak, who provided me with the original Amerysk booklet. I figured the Asatru community was a natural place to find those interested in Amerysk, and they probably wouldn't be familiar with the word 'conlang'--- though I did use that in the official description of the page.

I did a lot of 'liking' of Asatru and related pages as well. The reason is that when you are using Facebook as your page, anything you 'like' is credited to your page and not to your Facebook account. When you 'like' some lonely conlang page without thousands of previous 'likes', they will notice, perhaps visit your page.

In addition, you'll develop a Facebook feed for your page--- when you are using Facebook as your page--- that is targeted toward the kind of sites that might be interested in your page. You can comment on interesting posts (thoughtfully) and some other folks may get to know you.

You could also like pages that are not directly related to your conlang, but don't be spammy about it, and certainly don't pick hot-topic pages like those for celebrities. Perhaps a selected page or two for some topic you find of interest. (I may 'like' my favorite Doctor Who page--- it's a sci-fi television series--- since the folks that comment on that page seem the type to like 'lost languages' and the like.)

I should add that those Facebook pages that are based on Wikipedia articles are no good--- they don't make posts or anything, so there is no one there to notice that you liked them.

Another essential thing is to add your conlang blog to Networked Blogs. Once you do, you can add a syndication of your page to your Facebook page--- so your blog posts will all be published on your conlang's Facebook page. (You can also have it publish to your main Facebook page--- the one under your name.)

I hope this information will prove useful to other conlangers thinking of starting a Facebook page. Once you do, be sure and go to my Amerysk page and like it, and post a link to YOUR page on my wall so I can like you right back.

Facebook Page for Amerysk Conlang (and others)

Sunday, December 30th, 2012
Recently I started a Facebook page and a blog for Amerysk, a 1978 conlang I discovered through my friend Oak (the ORIGINAL Oak). I thought I'd share the experience for those doing likewise for their own favorite conlangs. (Doing likewise=starting Facebook page, not hanging out with the Original Oak.)

The first thing I did after starting Amerysk - A Lost Language (Facebook page) is that I clicked the little thingy in the upper right side of the screen and selected to use Facebook as Amerysk - A Lost Language.

Then I started looking for pages to like as Amerysk. I picked out pages dedicated to other conlangs and auxlangs. I got a lot for Esperanto and Volapük, a couple from Interlingua and then searched 'conlang'. I got a couple of pages people put up for their conlangs who wisely put '(conlang)' as part of their page title.

I might have done likewise but for one reason. The creator of Amerysk was a follower of the Asatru (Odinist, Norse Pagan) religion --- as was Oak, who provided me with the original Amerysk booklet. I figured the Asatru community was a natural place to find those interested in Amerysk, and they probably wouldn't be familiar with the word 'conlang'--- though I did use that in the official description of the page.

I did a lot of 'liking' of Asatru and related pages as well. The reason is that when you are using Facebook as your page, anything you 'like' is credited to your page and not to your Facebook account. When you 'like' some lonely conlang page without thousands of previous 'likes', they will notice, perhaps visit your page.

In addition, you'll develop a Facebook feed for your page--- when you are using Facebook as your page--- that is targeted toward the kind of sites that might be interested in your page. You can comment on interesting posts (thoughtfully) and some other folks may get to know you.

You could also like pages that are not directly related to your conlang, but don't be spammy about it, and certainly don't pick hot-topic pages like those for celebrities. Perhaps a selected page or two for some topic you find of interest. (I may 'like' my favorite Doctor Who page--- it's a sci-fi television series--- since the folks that comment on that page seem the type to like 'lost languages' and the like.)

I should add that those Facebook pages that are based on Wikipedia articles are no good--- they don't make posts or anything, so there is no one there to notice that you liked them.

Another essential thing is to add your conlang blog to Networked Blogs. Once you do, you can add a syndication of your page to your Facebook page--- so your blog posts will all be published on your conlang's Facebook page. (You can also have it publish to your main Facebook page--- the one under your name.)

I hope this information will prove useful to other conlangers thinking of starting a Facebook page. Once you do, be sure and go to my Amerysk page and like it, and post a link to YOUR page on my wall so I can like you right back.

Nevashi In Use

Sunday, December 30th, 2012
A little story I wrote in Teliya Nevashi:

Eci dev ecu ecufios in Grayu wa Gawa, gyet oesi mur ala ti dhil keshas ged. Fish mise zo inim osal i Gawa im uje ofu fi ec im iane, ofu vici nan. Ci talala wa ki roho’a pa ya lemyan i Grayu.

Raven and Crow sit on a rooftop, debating about which one is more clever. Crow fills a jar using stones in order to raise the water, in order to drink. Raven laughs and flies to the river.

While I am posting that, I might as well post this translation of Psalm 146: 3-4:

(ESV: Put not your trust in princes, in a son of man, in whom there is no salvation. When his breath departs, he returns to the earth; on that very day his plans perish.)

Seya imoroishi inim hletif, im jenve seke kwe seya vesi joa inim denet lia. Gyet ci gorem, lumi an ash rakesh; gyet dha ceba kova, ci gorem tash rohoma voi .

And translated back:
Do not trust leaders (captains), nothing more than a human that cannot rescue you. When he dies, he becomes earth (dirt) again; on that same day, his plan also dies.

I don't have a word for "princes" yet, but "leaders" or "captains" is more culturally appropriate. I do have the words for "when his breath (or spirit) departs," but I decided to go with the blunter, more direct approach.

The new grammar is getting test driven and tweaked as I go lately. I should break it down for you, but it is after midnight and I should have been in bed hours ago. Maybe soon. No promises.