Archive for July, 2014

Moten Word for the Day

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

mensin /me̞nsin/, noun: “cup; (outer) ear”

Eh… no, not like that ;).

Anyway, mensin is the diminutive form of menzola: “vase, jug”. It primarily refers to a small open container for liquids, i.e. a cup (not a glass though).

Probably through some kind of metaphorical extension, it has also come to be used to refer to the outer ear, i.e. what anatomists would call the pinna (or auricula). It doesn’t refer to the hearing organ itself, only to the visible part of the ear that projects outside of the head. In this sense, mensin is restricted to describing human ears. Animal ears are described using different words.

As a word, mensin is a typical case of what happens with derivations in human languages: however straightforward the derivation (here a simple diminutive), people will find a way to extend or change the meaning of the derived word in ways that couldn’t be expected just based on the meanings of the original word and of the derivation affix. So think about it when you create your conlang’s lexicon: it’s a great way to increase its vocabulary without having to agonise over yet another new root form :).

Questions?


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broom is leruta

Thursday, July 31st, 2014
leruta = broom (noun) (some things Google found for "leruta": a rare term; a very rare last name; a very rare antiquated feminine first name; user names; LeRuta is a gaming character name; similar Lenuta is a Romanian form of the feminine first name Helen; bad OCR of old texts)

Word derivation for "broom"
Basque = erratz, Finnish = luuta
Miresua = leruta

This is a new word, not a revision.

The word broom doesn't occur in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or Through the Looking-glass.

Atreej a! — She’s dancing, oh!

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014
A prayer from A Book of Pagan Prayer. I made it into a song!

There were some small alterations made. The rhythm came out rather like "Prayer of White Buffalo Woman", I suppose!

Order of texts: Original English -- Sandic -- English of Sandic
-----

On the rim of the world, she is dancing.
In her bright robe, she is dancing.
Young and lovely, she is dancing.
Dance, maiden, into the sky,
bringing the day to those who wait for you.

---

Pal griawa ba priia aww
atreej a
pa toga baahl sahei
atreej a
nabei wii wenai
atreej a
pa le:yarab mliika fuunsai
atreej a
ee mee-e kasahei
atreej a!

---

At the edge of our world
she's dancing, oh!
in a bright coat,
she's dancing, oh!
young and beautiful,
she's dancing, oh!
into the sky, that wise sun-person
she's dancing, oh!
as that illuminating sunrise
she is dancing!

Atreej a! — She’s dancing, oh!

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014
A prayer from A Book of Pagan Prayer. I made it into a song!

There were some small alterations made. The rhythm came out rather like "Prayer of White Buffalo Woman", I suppose!

Order of texts: Original English -- Sandic -- English of Sandic
-----

On the rim of the world, she is dancing.
In her bright robe, she is dancing.
Young and lovely, she is dancing.
Dance, maiden, into the sky,
bringing the day to those who wait for you.

---

Pal griawa ba priia aww
atreej a
pa toga baahl sahei
atreej a
nabei wii wenai
atreej a
pa le:yarab mliika fuunsai
atreej a
ee mee-e kasahei
atreej a!

---

At the edge of our world
she's dancing, oh!
in a bright coat,
she's dancing, oh!
young and beautiful,
she's dancing, oh!
into the sky, that wise sun-person
she's dancing, oh!
as that illuminating sunrise
she is dancing!

Moten Word for the Day

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

menzola /me̞nzo̞la/, noun: “jug, vase”

Basically any tall, open container, usually used to carry liquids, and/or things in liquids (like flowers). Moten doesn’t seem to make a distinction between vases, which usually have a wide open topside, and jugs, whose opening is usually narrow, and can be considered more on the side of the object rather than on top. For a Moten speaker, those are details and the same word works for both. As usual, context will generally disambiguate.

Okay, here’s a picture to illustrate (from now on I’ll try to illustrate my posts with pictures):

image

It’s relevant, the object on it could be considered both a vase or a jug depending on how you look at it! :)

Questions?


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Moten Word for the Day

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

menzola /me̞nzo̞la/, noun: “jug, vase”

Basically any tall, open container, usually used to carry liquids, and/or things in liquids (like flowers). Moten doesn’t seem to make a distinction between vases, which usually have a wide open topside, and jugs, whose opening is usually narrow, and can be considered more on the side of the object rather than on top. For a Moten speaker, those are details and the same word works for both. As usual, context will generally disambiguate.

Okay, here’s a picture to illustrate (from now on I’ll try to illustrate my posts with pictures):

image

It’s relevant, the object on it could be considered both a vase or a jug depending on how you look at it! :)

Questions?


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Kinship terms are still sort of unexamined

Monday, July 28th, 2014
Kinship terms need work. For one thing I'm thinking "grandma" and "grandpa" should have separate words, and maybe even "aunt" and "uncle" when I think more about it, but the point is: what is the underlying theory here? We do not want Esperanto. There should be some real human logic to the choices.

Beyond the "basic" terms, whatever those are, we need a system for generating the remaining terms for more distant relations. Like, affixes used only in kinship terms. We want to be able to specify...well, actually I'm not even exactly sure what would be relevant because I'm not very knowledgeable about genealogy. But I could certainly find out.

Moten Word for the Day

Sunday, July 27th, 2014

imajtagej /imajtaɡe̞j/, verb: to love, to be romantically attracted to

I did liking last time, so let’s do loving now :).

As a verb, imajtagej works like “to love”: the subject does the loving, and the object is the person loved. It is strictly restricted to romantic love, so the object will normally always be a person (or you’ll get weird looks! ;) ). Also, it means it cannot be used to mark familial love (I’ll get to that in a future post). So it represents only a subset of what the English verb “to love” represents.

The noun itself is majta: “romantic love”. And since I know people are going to ask, “I love you” is imajtagde|n ito, pronounced [imajtagde̞ɲito̞]. Note that this is only the verb itself conjugated in the present imperfective. The arguments are unmarked, as Moten is aggressively pro-drop and omits anything that can be inferred from context.

Questions?


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Still working on the ordinals

Sunday, July 27th, 2014
Idea for ordinal numbers: what about ka? So like, he pai ka sapi ta uni "on the seventh day he rested." That way there isn't the ambiguity with pai sapi between "seven days" and "seventh day," and we don't have to be stuck with the ungainly sapi pi pai all the time.

paintbrush is sivetxa

Saturday, July 26th, 2014
sivetxa = paintbrush (noun) (some things Google found for "sivetxa": a very rare term; name of an automated web script or bot; similar siveta.com is a Mexican website platform for business electronic transfers; similar Sivecha is a very rare last name; similar Sivech (aka Sivech-e Sofla) is the name of a village in western Iran)

Word derivation for "paintbrush"
Basque = brotxa, Finnish = sivellin
Miresua = sivetxa

This is the Mirusua word for paintbrush. The tx consonant combination in Miresua (as in Basque) is pronounced like ch. It'll be for either an artist's thin paintbush or a wide brush used to apply paint.

The Basque word for paintbrush brotxa appears to come the Spanish word brocha (or Catalan word brotxa). The Finnish word sivellin is derived from the Finnish verb sivellä meaning to stroke. Another word in Finnish for paintbrush is pensseli.

The word brush, as in paintbrush, occurs in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Seven flung down his brush, and had just begun "Well, of all the unjust things--" when his eye chanced to fall upon Alice, as she stood watching them, and he checked himself suddenly: the others looked round also, and all of them bowed low.

"Would you tell me," said Alice, a little timidly, "why you are painting those roses?"