Archive for December, 2014

31st Lexember Word

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

idukstu|l /idukstuʎ/, verb: “to fill, to fill up”

ipuzdu|l /ipuzduʎ/, verb: “to pierce, to perforate, to empty”

Bvaj “XXX” de kojpej, emekedelun puzdul!

(note: you may need to go to my blog page itself to play the video above)

So, not a meme for the last day of Lexember, but the most epic music piece I know :). Lifts me right up when I feel down! It does fit one of today’s words even :P.

So, to finish with Lexember, I decided to give you two words for the price of one again :). Although I did cheat a little: those words are both verbs derived from words from the last few days by adding istu|l to them. That little verb gets a lot of mileage doesn’t it? :)

Idukstu|l is a verb derived from duki, and thus simply means “to fill something (up)”. It’s strictly transitive. Ipuzdu|l is slightly more interesting. Being derived from puza, it means both “to pierce, to perforate” (i.e. to make a hole in something) and “to empty (a container)”. The meanings are obviously related (try and perforate a container without spilling its contents! :P). Like idukstu|l, ipuzdu|l is strictly transitive, and takes the thing being perforated or emptied as its object.

So, there you have it! Lexember is finished for this year! I really enjoyed this edition, and I hope you did too! Thank you all for following me until the end. I hope you enjoyed the words I created and their descriptions. Don’t hesitate to let me know what you thought of it all via my ask box! :) And one thing is certain, I will participate again in December 2015!

Finally, to everyone, Happy New Year! Imonuj |ledan!

Questions?


from Tumblr http://christophoronomicon.tumblr.com/post/106702571133
via IFTTT

31st Lexember Word

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

idukstu|l /idukstuʎ/, verb: “to fill, to fill up”

ipuzdu|l /ipuzduʎ/, verb: “to pierce, to perforate, to empty”

Bvaj “XXX” de kojpej, emekedelun puzdul!

(note: you may need to go to my blog page itself to play the video above)

So, not a meme for the last day of Lexember, but the most epic music piece I know :). Lifts me right up when I feel down! It does fit one of today’s words even :P.

So, to finish with Lexember, I decided to give you two words for the price of one again :). Although I did cheat a little: those words are both verbs derived from words from the last few days by adding istu|l to them. That little verb gets a lot of mileage doesn’t it? :)

Idukstu|l is a verb derived from duki, and thus simply means “to fill something (up)”. It’s strictly transitive. Ipuzdu|l is slightly more interesting. Being derived from puza, it means both “to pierce, to perforate” (i.e. to make a hole in something) and “to empty (a container)”. The meanings are obviously related (try and perforate a container without spilling its contents! :P). Like idukstu|l, ipuzdu|l is strictly transitive, and takes the thing being perforated or emptied as its object.

So, there you have it! Lexember is finished for this year! I really enjoyed this edition, and I hope you did too! Thank you all for following me until the end. I hope you enjoyed the words I created and their descriptions. Don’t hesitate to let me know what you thought of it all via my ask box! :) And one thing is certain, I will participate again in December 2015!

Finally, to everyone, Happy New Year! Imonuj |ledan!

Questions?


from Tumblr http://christophoronomicon.tumblr.com/post/106702571133
via IFTTT

orange (fruit) is laperni (revisited)

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014
laperni = orange (noun) (some things Google found for "laperni": an unusual term; a rare to unusual last name that can be Italian; user names; similar perni means pivots in Italian; similar Lapeni is the name of places in Latvia and Belarus)

Word derivation for "orange (fruit)" :
Basque = laranja, Finnish = appelsiini
Miresua = laperni

My previous word for orange (fruit), from only a few months ago, was laperani. I'm tweaking this word, slightly simplifying it. A rather small change.

The Basque word for orange, laranja, is the same as the Portuguese. The Finnish word for orange is apparently derived from Old Swedish appelsin, meaning "Chinese apple".

The word orange appears one time in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, when Alice falls down the rabbit-hole.
She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled 'ORANGE MARMALADE'...

Tatediem: Pronominal Possession, Indirect Objects

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
Tatediem marks indirect objects - these can only be humans, btw - by a specific set of prefixes (that in part are 'subsumed' in the object slot, generally prefixing themselves to the object prefix with some level of assimilation).


123
mascfemmascfemmascfem
sg-heŋ--heŋ--win--wir--ŋme--har-
dual-hami--himi--sin--tir--ŋra--ŋar-
pl-hew--hig--cin--cin--ŋim--lar-

Which, by the way, reminds me that I have not yet given the personal pronouns! Here, feminines to the right, masculines to the left:

12
subjobjsubjobj
sg-ke-, -ke--her-, -hec--gi-, -gi--wir-, -ŋwiŋ-
dl-am-, -im--kiim-, -kaam--di-, -tin--sir-, -sin-
pl-eg-, -ic--xec-, -ki--gi-, -gi--cir-, -cir-

As for expressing possession, the object prefixes can be affixed between the gender prefix and the root of a noun. However, many dialects have opted for marking an empty verb-like particle in the vicinity with the gender of the possessed noun (as subject), and the dative prefix (or the object prefix for dative-less nouns) as the object. The verb is -gìan-, a verb that in some dialects also can serve as copula. It lacks all other markings except subject and object. 

Conversely, some dialects use -páhí-, 'possess', and have a somewhat different structure - the possessor as possessor, and the possessee as subject. If the possessor has a dative marker, the possessee is marked with that prefix in the subject slot, whereas if the possessor is of some other gender, the possessor has a subject-like marking and the possessee an object marking.

Thus

ye-ŋəbs = the dog
ye-her-ŋəbs = my dog
ye-kiim-ŋəbs = the dog belonging to the two of us
ye-ŋim-ŋəbs - their dog
(assimilation often hits: yeki:ŋebs/yeki:mbs, yeŋiŋəbs/yeŋ:ibs) 
But also:
 (ye-)ŋəbs ye-heŋ-ìan = a/the dog that belongs to me (assimilated as yeŋəbs yeŋ:ì:n)
(ye-)ŋebs heŋ-ye-páhí = a/the dog that I own (assimilates to yeŋəbs heypáí)
(ye-)ŋebs ku-l-páhí = the dog that belongs to neut1 noun 

Sometimes, the prefix relating to the noun is omitted, if it is definite:
yeŋəbs heŋian
yeŋəbs kepáhí

Review of The Revenge of the Dead Enemy, by Marva Dasef

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
I haven't been blogging lately because of my recent surgery -- no enthusiam left for anything.  However, Marva Dasef, who has become one of my most devoted fans, posted a review on Dec. 19 (one day after the surgery) of the final Ki'shto'ba volume.  It's a great review (5 star) and I'm sorry I am only just getting around to sharing it here. See the original on Amazon, Goodreads, or Smashwords.  (And Marva is a really good writer herself.  See her books, including many in audio format, at Amazon.)
 
I'm a Termite Lover for Life
 
So you think you can't empathize with a giant termite? We've had many insectoid and arachnid heroes in literature. Consider "Charlotte's Web." If you didn't get teary-eyed when Charlotte died, then you must have a heart of stone. Other stories empathetic toward multi-legged creatures: Ant Bully, It's a Bug's Life, Bee Story. I'm sure there are others. I don't usually seek out books about bugs, but I could come up with these examples in a few seconds.

So, what about the entire epic journey "The Labors of Ki'sh'toba: Volumes 1-6?" I have previously reviewed 1-5, not to mention the 2-volume "Termite Queen" saga. I liked them...a lot. I continually complained about the difficult names, places, and concepts with the conlang (constructed language) of the Termite world. Too many apostrophes and a bunch of other punctuation I have no clue how to pronounce.

I will complain no more. I still can't pronounce 90% of the termite language, but I can visually recognize the names of the main characters. All have become familiar and lovable in their own ways. Di'fa'kro'mi, the Remembrancer (story teller) is quite an adept author considering he had to invent a written language in which to tell the tales. I know, the real Remembrancer is Lorinda Taylor, but she is such a wonderful writer, I was immersed in the stories as if they were really told by Di'fa'kro'mi.

As I did when first reading "Charlotte's Web," I wept over the death of some of my favorites throughout the entire six volumes. I cried for termites? Yes, I did, and I'm not ashamed.

The entire tale of Ki'shto'ba and his labors (modeled on the Greek Hercules myth) is hard to get into, but an epic worthy of the difficulty of the journey.

I completely and thoroughly recommend the entire six volumes. But you might want to start with the Termite Queen books to allow yourself to ease into the idea of termite heroes.
 
Thanks, Marva!  I appreciate it so much! 
 
 

Review of The Revenge of the Dead Enemy, by Marva Dasef

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
I haven't been blogging lately because of my recent surgery -- no enthusiam left for anything.  However, Marva Dasef, who has become one of my most devoted fans, posted a review on Dec. 19 (one day after the surgery) of the final Ki'shto'ba volume.  It's a great review (5 star) and I'm sorry I am only just getting around to sharing it here. See the original on Amazon, Goodreads, or Smashwords.  (And Marva is a really good writer herself.  See her books, including many in audio format, at Amazon.)
 
I'm a Termite Lover for Life
 
So you think you can't empathize with a giant termite? We've had many insectoid and arachnid heroes in literature. Consider "Charlotte's Web." If you didn't get teary-eyed when Charlotte died, then you must have a heart of stone. Other stories empathetic toward multi-legged creatures: Ant Bully, It's a Bug's Life, Bee Story. I'm sure there are others. I don't usually seek out books about bugs, but I could come up with these examples in a few seconds.

So, what about the entire epic journey "The Labors of Ki'sh'toba: Volumes 1-6?" I have previously reviewed 1-5, not to mention the 2-volume "Termite Queen" saga. I liked them...a lot. I continually complained about the difficult names, places, and concepts with the conlang (constructed language) of the Termite world. Too many apostrophes and a bunch of other punctuation I have no clue how to pronounce.

I will complain no more. I still can't pronounce 90% of the termite language, but I can visually recognize the names of the main characters. All have become familiar and lovable in their own ways. Di'fa'kro'mi, the Remembrancer (story teller) is quite an adept author considering he had to invent a written language in which to tell the tales. I know, the real Remembrancer is Lorinda Taylor, but she is such a wonderful writer, I was immersed in the stories as if they were really told by Di'fa'kro'mi.

As I did when first reading "Charlotte's Web," I wept over the death of some of my favorites throughout the entire six volumes. I cried for termites? Yes, I did, and I'm not ashamed.

The entire tale of Ki'shto'ba and his labors (modeled on the Greek Hercules myth) is hard to get into, but an epic worthy of the difficulty of the journey.

I completely and thoroughly recommend the entire six volumes. But you might want to start with the Termite Queen books to allow yourself to ease into the idea of termite heroes.
 
Thanks, Marva!  I appreciate it so much! 
 
 

Review of The Revenge of the Dead Enemy, by Marva Dasef

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
I haven't been blogging lately because of my recent surgery -- no enthusiam left for anything.  However, Marva Dasef, who has become one of my most devoted fans, posted a review on Dec. 19 (one day after the surgery) of the final Ki'shto'ba volume.  It's a great review (5 star) and I'm sorry I am only just getting around to sharing it here. See the original on Amazon, Goodreads, or Smashwords.  (And Marva is a really good writer herself.  See her books, including many in audio format, at Amazon.)
 
I'm a Termite Lover for Life
 
So you think you can't empathize with a giant termite? We've had many insectoid and arachnid heroes in literature. Consider "Charlotte's Web." If you didn't get teary-eyed when Charlotte died, then you must have a heart of stone. Other stories empathetic toward multi-legged creatures: Ant Bully, It's a Bug's Life, Bee Story. I'm sure there are others. I don't usually seek out books about bugs, but I could come up with these examples in a few seconds.

So, what about the entire epic journey "The Labors of Ki'sh'toba: Volumes 1-6?" I have previously reviewed 1-5, not to mention the 2-volume "Termite Queen" saga. I liked them...a lot. I continually complained about the difficult names, places, and concepts with the conlang (constructed language) of the Termite world. Too many apostrophes and a bunch of other punctuation I have no clue how to pronounce.

I will complain no more. I still can't pronounce 90% of the termite language, but I can visually recognize the names of the main characters. All have become familiar and lovable in their own ways. Di'fa'kro'mi, the Remembrancer (story teller) is quite an adept author considering he had to invent a written language in which to tell the tales. I know, the real Remembrancer is Lorinda Taylor, but she is such a wonderful writer, I was immersed in the stories as if they were really told by Di'fa'kro'mi.

As I did when first reading "Charlotte's Web," I wept over the death of some of my favorites throughout the entire six volumes. I cried for termites? Yes, I did, and I'm not ashamed.

The entire tale of Ki'shto'ba and his labors (modeled on the Greek Hercules myth) is hard to get into, but an epic worthy of the difficulty of the journey.

I completely and thoroughly recommend the entire six volumes. But you might want to start with the Termite Queen books to allow yourself to ease into the idea of termite heroes.
 
Thanks, Marva!  I appreciate it so much! 
 
 

30th Lexember Word

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

dukpuza /dukpuza/, noun: “fullness, emptiness, level; contents”

Indeed! While safety margins are a thing, engineers do want to fit needs as strictly as they can. And it often comes back to bite them later ;).

OK, I just couldn’t have a full month of Lexember without giving an example of what I think is the coolest word formation pattern in Moten :). Really, it’s that rad!

So, think of all the things that are basically ranges, like age, height, weight, distance, good vs. bad (and everything in between), etc. Those usually have a name, as well as words referring to specific values (usually extremes) on them (for instance, related to age are the words “young” and “old”; related to weight we have “light” and “heavy”; and related to distance we have “close” vs. “far”). In English, the name of a scale is usually either unrelated to the words referring to specific values (see “age” vs. “young” and “old”), or related to only one of them (“height” is related to “high”, but not to “low”).

In Moten, while some scales also have unrelated names, most scales are named by taking the words referring to extremes on those scales, and compounding them together into a single word! For instance, from odun: “young” and ukol: “old”, one forms ukodun: “age”. In the same way, from sezgo: “fast” and bontu: “slow,”, you get sezbon: “velocity, speed”.

Dukpuza, then, belongs to that type of nouns. It’s a compound of opposites duki: “full” and puza: “empty”, and rather than referring to a specific (high or low) level of contents within a container, it refers to the concept of such a level itself (hence the translation “level” being probably the most accurate here, although dukpuza lacks many of the other meanings of English “level”).

Naturally, since languages abhor neat and symmetrical things, it had to be that dukpuza would develop another meaning, moving from the level of contents within a container to referring to those contents themselves (at least in general). But that’s language for you ;).

Questions?


from Tumblr http://christophoronomicon.tumblr.com/post/106601783497
via IFTTT

30th Lexember Word

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

dukpuza /dukpuza/, noun: “fullness, emptiness, level; contents”

Indeed! While safety margins are a thing, engineers do want to fit needs as strictly as they can. And it often comes back to bite them later ;).

OK, I just couldn’t have a full month of Lexember without giving an example of what I think is the coolest word formation pattern in Moten :). Really, it’s that rad!

So, think of all the things that are basically ranges, like age, height, weight, distance, good vs. bad (and everything in between), etc. Those usually have a name, as well as words referring to specific values (usually extremes) on them (for instance, related to age are the words “young” and “old”; related to weight we have “light” and “heavy”; and related to distance we have “close” vs. “far”). In English, the name of a scale is usually either unrelated to the words referring to specific values (see “age” vs. “young” and “old”), or related to only one of them (“height” is related to “high”, but not to “low”).

In Moten, while some scales also have unrelated names, most scales are named by taking the words referring to extremes on those scales, and compounding them together into a single word! For instance, from odun: “young” and ukol: “old”, one forms ukodun: “age”. In the same way, from sezgo: “fast” and bontu: “slow,”, you get sezbon: “velocity, speed”.

Dukpuza, then, belongs to that type of nouns. It’s a compound of opposites duki: “full” and puza: “empty”, and rather than referring to a specific (high or low) level of contents within a container, it refers to the concept of such a level itself (hence the translation “level” being probably the most accurate here, although dukpuza lacks many of the other meanings of English “level”).

Naturally, since languages abhor neat and symmetrical things, it had to be that dukpuza would develop another meaning, moving from the level of contents within a container to referring to those contents themselves (at least in general). But that’s language for you ;).

Questions?


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Whither did you disappear? I want more bad ideas!

Monday, December 29th, 2014

I’m on holiday right now. Mobile Tumblr has the tendency to delete messages so I don’t want to post them here. I will get back home on the first and will start putting out more posts. Thanks for bearing with me!