Archive for July, 2015

Ćwarmin: A Detail about the Ćwarmin Infinitive

Monday, July 20th, 2015
I have previously given a short overview of the Ćwarmin infinitive, but more details about the use thereof will sporadically appear.

The infinitive is not the same as the verb stem, but has some infinitive suffix on it. There are several infinitive suffixes, and some of them have different implications, cf:
hacam - hacan - haćjul - to think
rigən - ridjel - ridjen - ridjin - to hurry
 The {hacam, hacan, haćjul} triplet shows three different suffixes, all with slightly different connotations: hacam - to believe something, hacan - to think about something, haćjul - to plan. The finite verbs conflate these. The {rigən, ridjul, ridjen, ridjin} four-tuplet distinguishes rigan - to hurry in regards to some thing, to be anxious for something, ridjul - to hurry with the intent to achieve something, ridjen - to be in a hurry so as not to miss a thing, ridjin - to hurry at the expense of the results

Now, these infinitives can appear sentence-initially as a topicalized ~adverb to specify which particular meaning is intended, while a finite form of the verb goes sentence-finally:
hacan bec terəś hacac? - what are you thinking about?
hacam bec terəś hacac? - what do you believe?
haćjul bec terəś hacac? - what do you plan to do?
bec terəś hacac? - what do you ... [any of the above]?
This is not a very common usage, but occurs when confusion is overwhelmingly likely or specifying which meaning is crucial.

spider is armahäki (revisited)

Sunday, July 19th, 2015
armahäki = spider (creature) (noun) (some things Google found for "armahäki": an unique term; did not match any documents; similar Armahani Finnish Lapphunds is a small exhibitor and breeder of dogs in Melbourne, Australia)

Word derivation for "spider" :
Basque = armiarma, Finnish = hämähäkki
Miresua = armahäki

My previous Miresua word for spider was hämiharma. I changed it so that the word doesn't end in -A. The word for spider is long (8 letters) because both the Basque and the Finnish words for spider are long.

The word spider does not appear in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or Through the Looking-Glass.

spider is armahäki (revisited)

Sunday, July 19th, 2015
armahäki = spider (creature) (noun) (some things Google found for "armahäki": an unique term; did not match any documents; similar Armahani Finnish Lapphunds is a small exhibitor and breeder of dogs in Melbourne, Australia)

Word derivation for "spider" :
Basque = armiarma, Finnish = hämähäkki
Miresua = armahäki

My previous Miresua word for spider was hämiharma. I changed it so that the word doesn't end in -A. The word for spider is long (8 letters) because both the Basque and the Finnish words for spider are long.

The word spider does not appear in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or Through the Looking-Glass.

spider is armahäki (revisited)

Sunday, July 19th, 2015
armahäki = spider (creature) (noun) (some things Google found for "armahäki": an unique term; did not match any documents; similar Armahani Finnish Lapphunds is a small exhibitor and breeder of dogs in Melbourne, Australia)

Word derivation for "spider" :
Basque = armiarma, Finnish = hämähäkki
Miresua = armahäki

My previous Miresua word for spider was hämiharma. I changed it so that the word doesn't end in -A. The word for spider is long (8 letters) because both the Basque and the Finnish words for spider are long.

The word spider does not appear in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or Through the Looking-Glass.

Detail #185: Inverse Number and Pronouns

Sunday, July 19th, 2015
Inverse number is a pretty neat thing found in the Tanoan family. Each noun class has an associated number or two, whose marking for that class is zero. The remaining number(s) are marked by a number marker.

Now, with personal pronouns this could open up some fun: of course, the simple way would be to have personal pronouns either follow some number class, so e.g. "I" is unmarked and "we" is marked. We could also, of course, leave the personal pronouns out of it altogether. However, fun could be had:

Let's have both singular and plural pronominal roots:
er : I
mur : we
Let's have the inverse number marker -xi, and have this apply to both of those as well:
erxi : we
muxi : I
There should be some subtle difference though: maybe erxi expresses my role in it as that of a representative of some group, whereas muxi represents my group as an extension of my will - i.e. I and my army, or the like. 

Another alternative could use these for deference and the like.

Many Tanoan languages seem to have classes that, for instance, mark dual with the inverse marker, and singular and plural both go with the zero marker. Tanoan languages also have a single number be the default, marking two numbers with the same marker. There is no guarantee that the marker or absence thereof only goes on "neighbouring" numbers.

If the language further has a dual number, a dual pronominal root could make stuff even more fun, but there may be parsing restrictions there, such as 'dual.inv' only parsing as singular (or only as plural, it's up to the conlanger, obviously) on pronouns. The parsing may of course be different for different persons as well (and different for pronouns of different noun classes too!)

#Yal Dawo: The Wheels on the Bus

Saturday, July 18th, 2015

Mo lienth'i ej Hhran'a ganass FijéNyen mädäv Vëthenuid Prathuin.
( I am tranlating a childrens' song about public transportation:)

vocabulary Jaossmedôl (n.):

                        bus/autobus S’randovraj (Hon. n.) also S’randov’a.

                       wheel: Mwd'i  (n., pr. "moody")
(a)round : mahel    (adj./v.)
town/city: S'ran Kajsh
to make/ to go: mad'o; also fan'a (to do)

                      around: gajeriet’a; also keter (adv.).



Mad'ea Mwd'ie S'randov'a mahel'e,
mahel'e,
mahel'e.
Mad'ea Mwd'ie S'randov'a mahel'e,
keter av S'ran Kajsh Na.



(The wheels on the bus go round and round
round and round
round and round.
The wheels on the bus go round and round,
All over town.)



Such translations of Yal Dawo words can be viewed more or less daily at Twitter.com@ArielCinii. This marks my third anniversary of Twitter activity.

#Yal Dawo: The Wheels on the Bus

Saturday, July 18th, 2015

Mo lienth'i ej Hhran'a ganass FijéNyen mädäv Vëthenuid Prathuin.
( I am tranlating a childrens' song about public transportation:)

vocabulary Jaossmedôl (n.):

                        bus/autobus S’randovraj (Hon. n.) also S’randov’a.

                       wheel: Mwd'i  (n., pr. "moody")
(a)round : mahel    (adj./v.)
town/city: S'ran Kajsh
to make/ to go: mad'o; also fan'a (to do)

                      around: gajeriet’a; also keter (adv.).



Mad'ea Mwd'ie S'randov'a mahel'e,
mahel'e,
mahel'e.
Mad'ea Mwd'ie S'randov'a mahel'e,
keter av S'ran Kajsh Na.



(The wheels on the bus go round and round
round and round
round and round.
The wheels on the bus go round and round,
All over town.)



Such translations of Yal Dawo words can be viewed more or less daily at Twitter.com@ArielCinii. This marks my third anniversary of Twitter activity.

#Yal Dawo: The Wheels on the Bus

Saturday, July 18th, 2015

Mo lienth'i ej Hhran'a ganass FijéNyen mädäv Vëthenuid Prathuin.
( I am tranlating a childrens' song about public transportation:)

vocabulary Jaossmedôl (n.):

                        bus/autobus S’randovraj (Hon. n.) also S’randov’a.

                       wheel: Mwd'i  (n., pr. "moody")
(a)round : mahel    (adj./v.)
town/city: S'ran Kajsh
to make/ to go: mad'o; also fan'a (to do)

                      around: gajeriet’a; also keter (adv.).



Mad'ea Mwd'ie S'randov'a mahel'e,
mahel'e,
mahel'e.
Mad'ea Mwd'ie S'randov'a mahel'e,
keter av S'ran Kajsh Na.



(The wheels on the bus go round and round
round and round
round and round.
The wheels on the bus go round and round,
All over town.)



Such translations of Yal Dawo words can be viewed more or less daily at Twitter.com@ArielCinii. This marks my third anniversary of Twitter activity.

Detail #184: Head-Marking Taken a Step too Far

Friday, July 17th, 2015
In a rather materially limited culture where also some form of incorporating polysynthesis operates, it is imaginable that some verbs may develop suppletive forms for certain verb-object or verb-subject combinations. For certain things, it might even be possible that there never was a noun, or that the noun has been lost, and the only way to refer to some thing or class of thing is by a limited set of verbs that mark that class by suppletion.

Would we notice if this already has happened in the languages we speak?

#408

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

A language where some words are free to use, but other words are considered “Premium” and must be unlocked via microtransactions. Every week, a different set of Premium words go on sale and a different set is temporarily free to use.