Archive for March, 2016

Ćwarmin Vocabulary: Accomodation

Thursday, March 31st, 2016
I'm planning to do some posts with the intention of increasing the size of the vocabularies of my conlangs. So, here's a first post on the theme. There'll be some cultural information as well.

Although the Ćwarmin were nomads until recently, a fair share of their population has settled in permanent settlements. The Nomadic lifestyle still holds a significant share of the Ćwarmin speakers.

This affects some 

badku has already been mentioned, and now means 'village'. It also signifies 'band'.
birsi signifies barns, and seems to come from bir, cattle. The latter part may have some connection to śisən, to build, which also is cognate to sirni, a temporary (wooden) structure.

perəc - granary. This is a loanword from Bryatesle pesr-axse, grain-store.

rumb - temple. A loan from Dairwueh ruvbe.

tor - well, but also water source in general

camto - the wall of a building

releś - door

harsab - roof

rukun - the 'floor' (generally, earth floors are the common thing)

woxa - a fire, from a word that was non-count in early Ćwarmin. Different dialects have developed a few different new words for the non-count meaning of 'fire', most deriving from either woxa or mexəć, e.g. woxruś, mexćeś. Several dialects still permit using woxa in a non-count sense as well.

kotad - a building, a house

cirneć - home (from the diminutive prefix cir- and early Ćwarmin mexəć, fire (countable))
'home' in a more general sense tends to form its case forms from 'mex-', rather than from 'cirneć', whereas when talking of a specific home, i.e. 'the home of a rich person' or anything where it is more specific than usual, you are likely to use cirne- as the root.
Few Ćwarmin houses have multiple rooms; windows are unusual too. A couple of holes exist, though, at opposite ends of the roof, for letting light in, smoke out, and air through. These can be covered with animal skins. 

arkal, poktal – leeward, windward air/smoke/light-holes
barg - skin for covering these holes

worarkal - 'big leeward air-hole', the usual name for glass windows. Such called because wind does not enter through them. Window glass is sirgurbarg, 'small big covering skin'. Where, 'sirgur-' signals the astonishment that glass first caused among the Ćwarmin.

walan - bed. Generally not a very comfortable nor large bed, usually just a pile of wool, sometimes hay and moss.

saupa - a big wooden water container

kosdan - tent fabric (generally skin)

matup - the wooden structure that keeps the tent up

ćiriŋ - the first tripod that is raised when raising a tent

me, when i pronounce a vowel: “open the airstream. stop having it be closed.”

Thursday, March 31st, 2016
me, when i pronounce a vowel: "open the airstream. stop having it be closed."

white is zulko (revisited)

Thursday, March 31st, 2016
zulko = white (color) (adjective) (Some things Google found for "zulko": an unusual term; user names; a rare last name that can be Polish or Slovak; gaming character names; similar Olympus camera Zuiko lenses; similar Zulkovo is another name for the village of Slavyani in Bulgaria)

Word derivation for "white" :
Basque = zuri, Finnish = valkoinen (valko)
Miresua = zulko

My previous Miresua conlang word for white was zulki. This is a small change. I'm changing the final vowel to the more unusual -O. This is to make the word stand out more. When forming the word, I dropped the adjective forming suffix -INEN from the Finnish source word.

Of course, the word white appears many times in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
"...when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her."

grammaticalityandotherjudgements: So yeah, big news of the week…

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016










grammaticalityandotherjudgements:

So yeah, big news of the week is @grammaticalityandotherjudgements is doing a collab with @badconlangingideas about what conlangs are and what goes into making one, and I, for one, am very excited

get hyped!

grammaticalityandotherjudgements: So yeah, big news of the week…

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016










grammaticalityandotherjudgements:

So yeah, big news of the week is @grammaticalityandotherjudgements is doing a collab with @badconlangingideas about what conlangs are and what goes into making one, and I, for one, am very excited

get hyped!

grammaticalityandotherjudgements: So yeah, big news of the week…

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016










grammaticalityandotherjudgements:

So yeah, big news of the week is @grammaticalityandotherjudgements is doing a collab with @badconlangingideas about what conlangs are and what goes into making one, and I, for one, am very excited

get hyped!

#452

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

As the Neogrammarians said, sound change has no memory - introduce massive changes in your conlang that you’re going to replace with different massive changes a day later because you forgot about the first one. If anyone notices, remind them that sound change has no memory.

Detail #264: Some Origins for Dual Marking on Verbs

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016
Consider the comitative. Now, let's consider this grammaticalization path:
general comitative case exists
the language has plural and singular congruence

>
 the comitative is lost, in general
 pronouns retain it, though

>

comitative pronouns get more restricted in distribution, and only appear after verbs

>

comitative pronouns are phonologically reduced and turned into affixes

>

the usage patterns make the meaning more like 'singular subject doing a thing together with singular comitative'

>

meaning slowly changes to just meaning 'two subjects'
Another possibility would be an adverb-like 'with' that needs no noun (but can take one). Things like 'he went with' come to signify 'he went [with (discourse topic)]'. Another possibility is for an applicative comitative voice, possibly by incorporating a comitative adposition.

Bryatesle: A Farewell with Religious Significance

Sunday, March 27th, 2016
In Bryatesle, Dairwueh, and less so Ćwarmin society, greetings often convey religious sentiments. Consider, for instance, the 'good night' farewell; many Bryatesle religiolects form this very much like English, but in the ablative (because that is the case generally used when wishing someone something) -
vind-ïn tal-ëta
good-abl.fem night-abl.fem
The kindaper religion, however, considers the night to be evil per se, a time when the sun-angel is subdued and weakened. Instead, they say
snyk-Ø ɕavr-ity
fast-(abl.masc) victory-abl.masc
(for a) fast victory!
Sometimes,  these also render 'good morning' as tënek/drask ɕavrity, either a 'strong' or 'right' victory, referring to the perception that the sun has (again) won over the night. Snyk-Ø and drask are shorter than the expected forms *snyk-ek, *drask-ek, due to haplology.

The same happens in Dairwueh, and to a lesser extent in Ćwarmin:
Ćwarmin:
samar śavr-otuc
fast victory-[def. comitative-to]
The comitative-to is used in Ćwarmin also for wishing someone something, or wishing it more generally as a form of interjection-like statement. Śavar is borrowed from Bryatesle's ɕaver, and the loss of the second syllable in both is a coincidence - the languages happen to have a similar morphophonological process going.

Dairwueh:
korŋa i marbr-u-ŋa
speed-instr to victory-instr
(victory comes from marbar, 'stronger', and basically originally meant 'strongerness')

Bryatesle: A Farewell with Religious Significance

Sunday, March 27th, 2016
In Bryatesle, Dairwueh, and less so Ćwarmin society, greetings often convey religious sentiments. Consider, for instance, the 'good night' farewell; many Bryatesle religiolects form this very much like English, but in the ablative (because that is the case generally used when wishing someone something) -
vind-ïn tal-ëta
good-abl.fem night-abl.fem
The kindaper religion, however, considers the night to be evil per se, a time when the sun-angel is subdued and weakened. Instead, they say
snyk-Ø ɕavr-ity
fast-(abl.masc) victory-abl.masc
(for a) fast victory!
Sometimes,  these also render 'good morning' as tënek/drask ɕavrity, either a 'strong' or 'right' victory, referring to the perception that the sun has (again) won over the night. Snyk-Ø and drask are shorter than the expected forms *snyk-ek, *drask-ek, due to haplology.

The same happens in Dairwueh, and to a lesser extent in Ćwarmin:
Ćwarmin:
samar śavr-otuc
fast victory-[def. comitative-to]
The comitative-to is used in Ćwarmin also for wishing someone something, or wishing it more generally as a form of interjection-like statement. Śavar is borrowed from Bryatesle's ɕaver, and the loss of the second syllable in both is a coincidence - the languages happen to have a similar morphophonological process going.

Dairwueh:
korŋa i marbr-u-ŋa
speed-instr to victory-instr
(victory comes from marbar, 'stronger', and basically originally meant 'strongerness')