Archive for September, 2016

#473

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

A language with attitudinal particles, akin to Lojban; the particle indicating smug or satisfied happiness is /uwu/.

Numbers in Sargaĺk

Sunday, September 11th, 2016
In the initial sprachbund of which Sargaĺk (and proto-Sargaĺk, and the whole proto-Sargaĺk-Bryatesle-Dairwueh) was part, a few tendencies with regards to numerals held.
  1. Numerals were morphologically invariant. (Except for morphemes that only served to 'structure' compound numbers)
  2. Base twenty with a subbase of ten.
  3. Numerals could be adverbials of repetition with intransitive verbs without any adpositions or other marker.
  4. Ordinal-like meanings could be obtained either by combining cardinals with adpositions (Bryatesle 'dedak', after, giving Bryatesle its off-by-one ordinal system; Dairwueh 'yil', about, like, made from, consisting of, during; Sargaĺk 'jaxru' in a sequence (or path)) or by combining the number with a variety of verbs ('stand at', 'reach', etc)
  5. Cardinals were not commonly used as attributes, but almost invariably as predicates.
  6. Ratios were not really used much; half, third, fourth and fifth had dedicated roots; larger denominators probably never appeared until the Bryatesle expansion.
  7. Ordinals for members of small sets (set sizes somewhat below 10) often were formed analogously to finger names; more general ordinals were formed by cardinal + adposition.
  8. 'all' is a numeral, and has ordinal as well as other numeral-like uses; There are two 'alls' - 'all in a relatively manageable set' and 'all (in some set of unknown size)'
  9. "none", "no", etc are not numeral-like in distribution
This has not survived entirely unchanged into Sargaĺk. Numerals, with the exception of 'one', are still morphologically invariant. The base still is twenty, and a subbase of ten still is clearly visible. Sargaĺk retains both adpositional/adnominal and verbal ways of expressing ordinals. Five is somewhat abandoned, in that numerals now freely appear as attributes. Recently ways of forming ratios of greater complexity than N/5 have developed. Ordinals by finger names can be used for orders in sets smaller than five, starting with the thumb. 'All' no longer distributes like a numeral, but one can form ordinals from it: from the greater all, 'od', the ordinal construction simply signifies the final, finally, the last one, from the set-specific all, 'odar', it signifies the most recent, the latest, the last one (of a queue or line or set).

In Bryatelse and Dairwueh, these properties have developed slightly differently: Bryatesle has given numerals case (and gender), both as independent heads of NPs and as attributes and determiners. There are but a few traces of base 20 left (the words for 200 and 400 among them). Much like in Sargaĺk, ordinals are formed by a postposition (but it has its 'off by one'-quirk). Cardinals are used as determiners and attributes, and ratios are commonplace. Names of fingers for ordinals have largely been abandoned. 'All' operates more like an indefinite determiner or pronoun.

The numbers of Sargaĺk are these (with some gaps where the forms should be predictable):
1: dər
2: yor
3: xrik
4: knər, bilon*
5: mil, salp*
6: mur
7: ćəx
8: ksen
9: lini10: təŋbar ('half-twenty')
11: dərdər
12: yoryor
13: xrikəxrik
14: knərəknər
15: xriksalp ('three hands')
16: murmur
17: ćəxćəx
18: ksenəksen
19: linilin
20: baran
21: baran dər
22: baran yor
.
.
30: xriktəŋbar ('three half twenty', 30)
31: xriktəŋbar dər
40: yorbar
50: yorbartəŋbar
51: yorbartəŋbardər
60: xrikbar
200: təŋkuton: half of 400
340: ćəxćəxbar
400: kuton
Numbers much larger than 400 are seldom used, and formed somewhat haphazardly.

As mentioned, ordinals are formed by the dummy noun jaxru. The number of repetitions something has been performed is marked by the bare numeral for intransitive verbs, but with the dummy noun k'abar (derived from the verb 'sidan', take) for transitive verbs.


The noun following the numeral is in the singular for any case but the pegative, for which the number is plural after numbers greater than one.

* bilon and salp are words denoting the four non-thumb fingers or the full palm; sometimes, they are used as numbers.

Yal Dawo: pre-heat wave

Thursday, September 8th, 2016
LINGUA-NERDING, Based on a Retweeet of a picture of a waterfall (What else do you think of just before a predicted heat wave?)

waterfall: Soor'e Gesh'e (Hon. n.)

When I started to teach myself the old language, I divided a page in half. On one side were words that were HONOURATIVE and on the other half were LESSER, or common words. Lessers are words that, the word and nothing but the word. It willl appear with its customary conjugations, or not, whether it's a verb or a noun or something else. Honouratives are words that are affected by other words or word-parts which serve to make them more complictaed.

Here, the term "waterfall" translates as "falling water", and so soor'o (v., to fell) becomes not only an adjective but an adverb (falling), and therefore gets a conjugative ending after the apostrophe to modify the noun for water. You're literally saying, "water, it fallls".  You're also making  a distinction. Gesh'e refers to drinkable water, or water you can hold in a cup or use from a faucet, while Aw'u (n.) refers to a body of water like a pool, a lake, or a sea, while a river is Cva (n., pron. "Kvah") . If you just want water to splash around, that would just be Awu Gesh'e and would be a common, or lesser word and it is using both terms to specify its meaning.  One may also use Neess (N./v.) to refer to a shower or sprinkle, or ˆmuth or Muthëd
for  a flood.

I make an effort to translate one or two Sartine words per day at Twitetr.com@ArielCinii

Yal Dawo: pre-heat wave

Thursday, September 8th, 2016
LINGUA-NERDING, Based on a Retweeet of a picture of a waterfall (What else do you think of just before a predicted heat wave?)

waterfall: Soor'e Gesh'e (Hon. n.)

When I started to teach myself the old language, I divided a page in half. On one side were words that were HONOURATIVE and on the other half were LESSER, or common words. Lessers are words that, the word and nothing but the word. It willl appear with its customary conjugations, or not, whether it's a verb or a noun or something else. Honouratives are words that are affected by other words or word-parts which serve to make them more complictaed.

Here, the term "waterfall" translates as "falling water", and so soor'o (v., to fell) becomes not only an adjective but an adverb (falling), and therefore gets a conjugative ending after the apostrophe to modify the noun for water. You're literally saying, "water, it fallls".  You're also making  a distinction. Gesh'e refers to drinkable water, or water you can hold in a cup or use from a faucet, while Aw'u (n.) refers to a body of water like a pool, a lake, or a sea, while a river is Cva (n., pron. "Kvah") . If you just want water to splash around, that would just be Awu Gesh'e and would be a common, or lesser word and it is using both terms to specify its meaning.  One may also use Neess (N./v.) to refer to a shower or sprinkle, or ˆmuth or Muthëd
for  a flood.

I make an effort to translate one or two Sartine words per day at Twitetr.com@ArielCinii

A Ćwarmin "Gender"/Number-Discongruence Thing

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016
Although Ćwarmin does not have grammatical gender, some nouns and adjectives essentially have some form of "natural" gender. These include words such as "husband", "wife", "father", "son", "sister", "boy", "friend (male)", "friend (female)" etc, and among adjectives we have "handsome", "beautiful", "strong-willed (man)", "strong-willed (female)", "tall (man)", "tall (female)", "friendly (male)", "friendly (female)", "push-over (male)", "push-over (female)", ...

Sometimes, there is a gender/number discongruence thing going on, when one out of a pair of persons is described as being in relation to the other, or when two persons' relation is described in terms of such a noun, i.e.

I am brothers with her|him
śen itiś* kesr-il-cə
I 3sg_com brother_pl_compl

I am friends with him|her
śan utuś* ator-ul-co
I ... friend_pl_compl

(s)he is friends with him|her**
u totuś ator-ul-co
* or tetiś/totuś
** if both pronouns refer to females, aksan, female friend, is expected.
Funnily enough, "I" lacks this type of grammatical gender altogether, and the selection of noun can therefore get somewhat weird:
I am wives with 3sg
san utuś uvan-ul-co
As far as the speakers of the language go, they actually tend to parse the meaning of these kinds of constructions as whichever out of
I (and she), I am (such that) she is wife. (male speaker's utterance)
I (and he), we are (such that) I am wife (female speaker's utterance)
makes sense of the biological gender of the person given cultural assumptions. The plural of the complement agrees accidentally with the two implicitly plural subjects.

Essentially,  'with her' is parsed as the NP that is being predicated, and the subject is rather topic-like. This is basically only permissible with first and third person nouns, however - second person only permits readings where the subject is predicated:
you are husbands with her
bac utuś nogd-ul-co

you are wives with him
bac utuś uvan-ul-co
With coordinated subjects, whichever comes first usually "wins", whereas if there's a pronoun that refers to a mixed pair (or group), the male noun/adjective usually wins, but exceptions exist - "wife", "friendly (female)" and "beautiful", for instance. The example with "wife" probably has to do with the wife being considered the 'central' part of marriage – undoubtedly due to the wife being the person giving birth to children.
 

AL. WOTD: SIBLING ET AL.

Monday, September 5th, 2016
Há!!! Today I bring you the 9th and last part of the spreadsheet I made 8 days ago. I think most of you must be wondering why I use this way of presenting my language, and most of you must be answering that it must be because I know nothing about cases. I had 4 years of Latin and 2 years of Greek in high school, and I use to explain cases to my classmates and to my students when I did particular classes for a living. I know perfectly what a case is and how to use it. But I'm also a computers programmer, and I know nobody understands anything about programming because its level of complexity and abstraction, and I don't want my language to be an obscure object of reflexion by linguists, but a new popular language like Esperanto. That is why I don't use cases in my explanations of this language, and I prefer to use spreadsheets, which by te way allow me to see how certain phrases and collocations sound in my conlang. Said that, here's part 9th. Bá!!!
Ál /áil/, creator of conlang Al /ál/

AL PRON. ENGLISH AL PRON. ENGLISH
pe /pé/ [the] sibling(fmr) pE /pés/ [the] siblings(fmr)
/péi/ [the] sibling(vfr) /péis/ [the] siblings(vfr)
/péu/ [the] cousin(gen) /péus/ [the] cousins(gen)
/pée/ [the] sibling(fml) /pées/ [the] siblings(fml)
/péa/ [the] half sibling /péas/ [the] half siblings
py /péo/ [the] h.cousin(g) pY /péos/ [the] h.cousins(g)
pie /pié/ my/our sibling(fmr) piE /piés/ my/our siblings(fmr)
pié /piéi/ my/our sibling(vfr) piÉ /piéis/ my/our siblings(vfr)
pië /piéu/ my/our cousin(gen) piË /piéus/ my/our cousins(gen)
piè /piée/ my/our sibling(fml) piÈ /piées/ my/our siblings(fml)
piê /piéa/ my/our half sibling piÊ /piéas/ my/our half siblings
piy /piéo/ my/our h.cousin(g) piY /piéos/ my/our h.cousins(g)
pue /pué/ your sibling(fmr) puE /pués/ your siblings(fmr)
pué /puéi/ your sibling(vfr) puÉ /puéis/ your siblings(vfr)
puë /puéu/ your cousin(gen) puË /puéus/ your cousins(gen)
puè /puée/ your sibling(fml) puÈ /puées/ your siblings(fml)
puê /puéa/ your half sibling puÊ /puéas/ your half siblings
puy /puéo/ your h.cousin(g) puY /puéos/ your h.cousins(g)
pee /peé/ their sibling(fmr) peE /peés/ their siblings(fmr)
peé /peéi/ their sibling(vfr) peÉ /peéis/ their siblings(vfr)
peë /peéu/ their cousin(gen) peË /peéus/ their cousins(gen)
peè /peée/ their sibling(fml) peÈ /peées/ their siblings(fml)
peê /peéa/ their half sibling peÊ /peéas/ their half siblings
pey /peéo/ their h.cousin(g) peY /peéos/ their h.cousins(g)
pae /paé/ her/FP sibling(fmr) paE /paés/ her/FP siblings(fmr)
paé /paéi/ her/FP sibling(vfr) paÉ /paéis/ her/FP siblings(vfr)
paë /paéu/ her/FP cousin(gen) paË /paéus/ her/FP cousins(gen)
paè /paée/ her/FP sibling(fml) paÈ /paées/ her/FP siblings(fml)
paê /paéa/ her/FP half sibling paÊ /paéas/ her/FP half siblings
pay /paéo/ her/FP h.cousin(g) paY /paéos/ her/FP h.cousins(g)
poe /poé/ his/MP sibling(fmr) poE /poés/ his/MP siblings(fmr)
poé /poéi/ his/MP sibling(vfr) poÉ /poéis/ his/MP siblings(vfr)
poë /poéu/ his/MP cousin(gen) poË /poéus/ his/MP cousins(gen)
poè /poée/ his/MP sibling(fml) poÈ /poées/ his/MP siblings(fml)
poê /poéa/ his/MP half sibling poÊ /poéas/ his/MP half siblings
poy /poéo/ his/MP h.cousin(g) poY /poéos/ his/MP h.cousins(g)
pIe /pisé/ our sibling(fmr) pIE /pisés/ our siblings(fmr)
pIé /piséi/ our sibling(vfr) pIÉ /piséis/ our siblings(vfr)
pIë /piséu/ our cousin(gen) pIË /piséus/ our cousins(gen)
pIè /pisée/ our sibling(fml) pIÈ /pisées/ our siblings(fml)
pIê /piséa/ our half sibling pIÊ /piséas/ our half siblings
pIy /piséo/ our h.cousin(g) pIY /piséos/ our h.cousins(g)
pUe /pusé/ your(p)sibling(fmr) pUE /pusés/ your(p)siblings(fmr)
pUé /puséi/ your(p)sibling(vfr) pUÉ /puséis/ your(p)siblings(vfr)
pUë /puséu/ your(p)cousin(gen) pUË /puséus/ your(p)cousins(gen)
pUè /pusée/ your(p)sibling(fml) pUÈ /pusées/ your(p)siblings(fml)
pUê /puséa/ your(p)half sibling pUÊ /puséas/ your(p)half siblings
pUy /puséo/ your(p)h.cousin(g) pUY /puséos/ your(p)h.cousins(g)
pEe /pesé/ their(p)sibling(fmr) pEE /pesés/ their(p)siblings(fmr)
pEé /peséi/ their(p)sibling(vfr) pEÉ /peséis/ their(p)siblings(vfr)
pEë /peséu/ their(p)cousin(gen) pEË /peséus/ their(p)cousins(gen)
pEè /pesée/ their(p)sibling(fml) pEÈ /pesées/ their(p)siblings(fml)
pEê /peséa/ their(p)half sibling pEÊ /peséas/ their(p)half siblings
pEy /peséo/ their(p)h.cousin(g) pEY /peséos/ their(p)h.cousins(g)
pAe /pasé/ their(f)sibling(fmr) pAE /pasés/ their(f)siblings(fmr)
pAé /paséi/ their(f)sibling(vfr) pAÉ /paséis/ their(f)siblings(vfr)
pAë /paséu/ their(f)cousin(gen) pAË /paséus/ their(f)cousins(gen)
pAè /pasée/ their(f)sibling(fml) pAÈ /pasées/ their(f)siblings(fml)
pAê /paséa/ their(f)half sibling pAÊ /paséas/ their(f)half siblings
pAy /paséo/ their(f)h.cousin(g) pAY /paséos/ their(f)h.cousins(g)
pOe /posé/ their(m)sibling(fmr) pOE /posés/ their(m)siblings(fmr)
pOé /poséi/ their(m)sibling(vfr) pOÉ /poséis/ their(m)siblings(vfr)
pOë /poséu/ their(m)cousin(gen) pOË /poséus/ their(m)cousins(gen)
pOè /posée/ their(m)sibling(fml) pOÈ /posées/ their(m)siblings(fml)
pOê /poséa/ their(m)half sibling pOÊ /poséas/ their(m)half siblings
pOy /poséo/ their(m)h.cousin(g) pOY /poséos/ their(m)h.cousins(g)

AL. WOTD: SIBLING ET AL.

Monday, September 5th, 2016
Há!!! Today I bring you the 9th and last part of the spreadsheet I made 8 days ago. I think most of you must be wondering why I use this way of presenting my language, and most of you must be answering that it must be because I know nothing about cases. I had 4 years of Latin and 2 years of Greek in high school, and I use to explain cases to my classmates and to my students when I did particular classes for a living. I know perfectly what a case is and how to use it. But I'm also a computers programmer, and I know nobody understands anything about programming because its level of complexity and abstraction, and I don't want my language to be an obscure object of reflexion by linguists, but a new popular language like Esperanto. That is why I don't use cases in my explanations of this language, and I prefer to use spreadsheets, which by te way allow me to see how certain phrases and collocations sound in my conlang. Said that, here's part 9th. Bá!!!
Ál /áil/, creator of conlang Al /ál/

AL PRON. ENGLISH AL PRON. ENGLISH
pe /pé/ [the] sibling(fmr) pE /pés/ [the] siblings(fmr)
/péi/ [the] sibling(vfr) /péis/ [the] siblings(vfr)
/péu/ [the] cousin(gen) /péus/ [the] cousins(gen)
/pée/ [the] sibling(fml) /pées/ [the] siblings(fml)
/péa/ [the] half sibling /péas/ [the] half siblings
py /péo/ [the] h.cousin(g) pY /péos/ [the] h.cousins(g)
pie /pié/ my/our sibling(fmr) piE /piés/ my/our siblings(fmr)
pié /piéi/ my/our sibling(vfr) piÉ /piéis/ my/our siblings(vfr)
pië /piéu/ my/our cousin(gen) piË /piéus/ my/our cousins(gen)
piè /piée/ my/our sibling(fml) piÈ /piées/ my/our siblings(fml)
piê /piéa/ my/our half sibling piÊ /piéas/ my/our half siblings
piy /piéo/ my/our h.cousin(g) piY /piéos/ my/our h.cousins(g)
pue /pué/ your sibling(fmr) puE /pués/ your siblings(fmr)
pué /puéi/ your sibling(vfr) puÉ /puéis/ your siblings(vfr)
puë /puéu/ your cousin(gen) puË /puéus/ your cousins(gen)
puè /puée/ your sibling(fml) puÈ /puées/ your siblings(fml)
puê /puéa/ your half sibling puÊ /puéas/ your half siblings
puy /puéo/ your h.cousin(g) puY /puéos/ your h.cousins(g)
pee /peé/ their sibling(fmr) peE /peés/ their siblings(fmr)
peé /peéi/ their sibling(vfr) peÉ /peéis/ their siblings(vfr)
peë /peéu/ their cousin(gen) peË /peéus/ their cousins(gen)
peè /peée/ their sibling(fml) peÈ /peées/ their siblings(fml)
peê /peéa/ their half sibling peÊ /peéas/ their half siblings
pey /peéo/ their h.cousin(g) peY /peéos/ their h.cousins(g)
pae /paé/ her/FP sibling(fmr) paE /paés/ her/FP siblings(fmr)
paé /paéi/ her/FP sibling(vfr) paÉ /paéis/ her/FP siblings(vfr)
paë /paéu/ her/FP cousin(gen) paË /paéus/ her/FP cousins(gen)
paè /paée/ her/FP sibling(fml) paÈ /paées/ her/FP siblings(fml)
paê /paéa/ her/FP half sibling paÊ /paéas/ her/FP half siblings
pay /paéo/ her/FP h.cousin(g) paY /paéos/ her/FP h.cousins(g)
poe /poé/ his/MP sibling(fmr) poE /poés/ his/MP siblings(fmr)
poé /poéi/ his/MP sibling(vfr) poÉ /poéis/ his/MP siblings(vfr)
poë /poéu/ his/MP cousin(gen) poË /poéus/ his/MP cousins(gen)
poè /poée/ his/MP sibling(fml) poÈ /poées/ his/MP siblings(fml)
poê /poéa/ his/MP half sibling poÊ /poéas/ his/MP half siblings
poy /poéo/ his/MP h.cousin(g) poY /poéos/ his/MP h.cousins(g)
pIe /pisé/ our sibling(fmr) pIE /pisés/ our siblings(fmr)
pIé /piséi/ our sibling(vfr) pIÉ /piséis/ our siblings(vfr)
pIë /piséu/ our cousin(gen) pIË /piséus/ our cousins(gen)
pIè /pisée/ our sibling(fml) pIÈ /pisées/ our siblings(fml)
pIê /piséa/ our half sibling pIÊ /piséas/ our half siblings
pIy /piséo/ our h.cousin(g) pIY /piséos/ our h.cousins(g)
pUe /pusé/ your(p)sibling(fmr) pUE /pusés/ your(p)siblings(fmr)
pUé /puséi/ your(p)sibling(vfr) pUÉ /puséis/ your(p)siblings(vfr)
pUë /puséu/ your(p)cousin(gen) pUË /puséus/ your(p)cousins(gen)
pUè /pusée/ your(p)sibling(fml) pUÈ /pusées/ your(p)siblings(fml)
pUê /puséa/ your(p)half sibling pUÊ /puséas/ your(p)half siblings
pUy /puséo/ your(p)h.cousin(g) pUY /puséos/ your(p)h.cousins(g)
pEe /pesé/ their(p)sibling(fmr) pEE /pesés/ their(p)siblings(fmr)
pEé /peséi/ their(p)sibling(vfr) pEÉ /peséis/ their(p)siblings(vfr)
pEë /peséu/ their(p)cousin(gen) pEË /peséus/ their(p)cousins(gen)
pEè /pesée/ their(p)sibling(fml) pEÈ /pesées/ their(p)siblings(fml)
pEê /peséa/ their(p)half sibling pEÊ /peséas/ their(p)half siblings
pEy /peséo/ their(p)h.cousin(g) pEY /peséos/ their(p)h.cousins(g)
pAe /pasé/ their(f)sibling(fmr) pAE /pasés/ their(f)siblings(fmr)
pAé /paséi/ their(f)sibling(vfr) pAÉ /paséis/ their(f)siblings(vfr)
pAë /paséu/ their(f)cousin(gen) pAË /paséus/ their(f)cousins(gen)
pAè /pasée/ their(f)sibling(fml) pAÈ /pasées/ their(f)siblings(fml)
pAê /paséa/ their(f)half sibling pAÊ /paséas/ their(f)half siblings
pAy /paséo/ their(f)h.cousin(g) pAY /paséos/ their(f)h.cousins(g)
pOe /posé/ their(m)sibling(fmr) pOE /posés/ their(m)siblings(fmr)
pOé /poséi/ their(m)sibling(vfr) pOÉ /poséis/ their(m)siblings(vfr)
pOë /poséu/ their(m)cousin(gen) pOË /poséus/ their(m)cousins(gen)
pOè /posée/ their(m)sibling(fml) pOÈ /posées/ their(m)siblings(fml)
pOê /poséa/ their(m)half sibling pOÊ /poséas/ their(m)half siblings
pOy /poséo/ their(m)h.cousin(g) pOY /poséos/ their(m)h.cousins(g)

Conlangery #123: Stress Systems

Monday, September 5th, 2016
Today we talk all about word-level stress systems, a part of your conlang that can be done in a few minutes or have you stressing for many days, weeks, or maybe months. It all comes down to what kind of stress system you go with. Top of Show Greeting: Modern Standard Arabic (translated and read... Read more »

AL. WOTD: BROTHER ET AL.

Sunday, September 4th, 2016
Há!!! Few people visited my last post, and nobody commented. I suspect nobody is reading this posts since already everybody knows the mechanics. Because of that, today I'm just gonna bring part 8th. Enjoy it!!! Bá!!!
Ál /áil/, creator of conlang Al /ál/

AL PRON. ENGLISH AL PRON. ENGLISH
de /dé/ [the] bro dE /dés/ [the] bros
/déi/ [the] brody /déis/ [the] brodies
/déu/ [the] male cousin /déus/ [the] male cousins
/dée/ [the] brother /dées/ [the] brothers
/déa/ [the] half brother /déas/ [the] half brothers
dy /déo/ [the] h.m.cousin dY /déos/ [the] h.m.cousins
die /dié/ my/our bro diE /diés/ my/our bros
dié /diéi/ my/our brody diÉ /diéis/ my/our brodies
dië /diéu/ my/our male cousin diË /diéus/ my/our male cousins
diè /diée/ my/our brother diÈ /diées/ my/our brothers
diê /diéa/ my/our half brother diÊ /diéas/ my/our half brothers
diy /diéo/ my/our h.m.cousin diY /diéos/ my/our h.m.cousins
due /dué/ your bro duE /dués/ your bros
dué /duéi/ your brody duÉ /duéis/ your brodies
duë /duéu/ your male cousin duË /duéus/ your male cousins
duè /duée/ your brother duÈ /duées/ your brothers
duê /duéa/ your half brother duÊ /duéas/ your half brothers
duy /duéo/ your h.m.cousin duY /duéos/ your h.m.cousins
dee /deé/ their bro deE /deés/ their bros
deé /deéi/ their brody deÉ /deéis/ their brodies
deë /deéu/ their male cousin deË /deéus/ their male cousins
deè /deée/ their brother deÈ /deées/ their brothers
deê /deéa/ their half brother deÊ /deéas/ their half brothers
dey /deéo/ their h.m.cousin deY /deéos/ their h.m.cousins
dae /daé/ her/FP bro daE /daés/ her/FP bros
daé /daéi/ her/FP brody daÉ /daéis/ her/FP brodies
daë /daéu/ her/FP male cousin daË /daéus/ her/FP male cousins
daè /daée/ her/FP brother daÈ /daées/ her/FP brothers
daê /daéa/ her/FP half brother daÊ /daéas/ her/FP half brothers
day /daéo/ her/FP h.m.cousin daY /daéos/ her/FP h.m.cousins
doe /doé/ his/MP bro doE /doés/ his/MP bros
doé /doéi/ his/MP brody doÉ /doéis/ his/MP brodies
doë /doéu/ his/MP male cousin doË /doéus/ his/MP male cousins
doè /doée/ his/MP brother doÈ /doées/ his/MP brothers
doê /doéa/ his/MP half brother doÊ /doéas/ his/MP half brothers
doy /doéo/ his/MP h.m.cousin doY /doéos/ his/MP h.m.cousins
dIe /disé/ our bro dIE /disés/ our bros
dIé /diséi/ our brody dIÉ /diséis/ our brodies
dIë /diséu/ our male cousin dIË /diséus/ our male cousins
dIè /disée/ our brother dIÈ /disées/ our brothers
dIê /diséa/ our half brother dIÊ /diséas/ our half brothers
dIy /diséo/ our h.m.cousin dIY /diséos/ our h.m.cousins
dUe /dusé/ your(p)bro dUE /dusés/ your(p)bros
dUé /duséi/ your(p)brody dUÉ /duséis/ your(p)brodies
dUë /duséu/ your(p)male cousin dUË /duséus/ your(p)male cousins
dUè /dusée/ your(p)brother dUÈ /dusées/ your(p)brothers
dUê /duséa/ your(p)half brother dUÊ /duséas/ your(p)half brothers
dUy /duséo/ your(p)h.m.cousin dUY /duséos/ your(p)h.m.cousins
dEe /desé/ their(p)bro dEE /desés/ their(p)bros
dEé /deséi/ their(p)brody dEÉ /deséis/ their(p)brodies
dEë /deséu/ their(p)male cousin dEË /deséus/ their(p)male cousins
dEè /desée/ their(p)brother dEÈ /desées/ their(p)brothers
dEê /deséa/ their(p)half brother dEÊ /deséas/ their(p)half brothers
dEy /deséo/ their(p)h.m.cousin dEY /deséos/ their(p)h.m.cousins
dAe /dasé/ their(f)bro dAE /dasés/ their(f)bros
dAé /daséi/ their(f)brody dAÉ /daséis/ their(f)brodies
dAë /daséu/ their(f)male cousin dAË /daséus/ their(f)male cousins
dAè /dasée/ their(f)brother dAÈ /dasées/ their(f)brothers
dAê /daséa/ their(f)half brother dAÊ /daséas/ their(f)half brothers
dAy /daséo/ their(f)h.m.cousin dAY /daséos/ their(f)h.m.cousins
dOe /dosé/ their(m)bro dOE /dosés/ their(m)bros
dOé /doséi/ their(m)brody dOÉ /doséis/ their(m)brodies
dOë /doséu/ their(m)male cousin dOË /doséus/ their(m)male cousins
dOè /dosée/ their(m)brother dOÈ /dosées/ their(m)brothers
dOê /doséa/ their(m)half brother dOÊ /doséas/ their(m)half brothers
dOy /doséo/ their(m)h.m.cousin dOY /doséos/ their(m)h.m.cousins

AL. WOTD: BROTHER ET AL.

Sunday, September 4th, 2016
Há!!! Few people visited my last post, and nobody commented. I suspect nobody is reading this posts since already everybody knows the mechanics. Because of that, today I'm just gonna bring part 8th. Enjoy it!!! Bá!!!
Ál /áil/, creator of conlang Al /ál/

AL PRON. ENGLISH AL PRON. ENGLISH
de /dé/ [the] bro dE /dés/ [the] bros
/déi/ [the] brody /déis/ [the] brodies
/déu/ [the] male cousin /déus/ [the] male cousins
/dée/ [the] brother /dées/ [the] brothers
/déa/ [the] half brother /déas/ [the] half brothers
dy /déo/ [the] h.m.cousin dY /déos/ [the] h.m.cousins
die /dié/ my/our bro diE /diés/ my/our bros
dié /diéi/ my/our brody diÉ /diéis/ my/our brodies
dië /diéu/ my/our male cousin diË /diéus/ my/our male cousins
diè /diée/ my/our brother diÈ /diées/ my/our brothers
diê /diéa/ my/our half brother diÊ /diéas/ my/our half brothers
diy /diéo/ my/our h.m.cousin diY /diéos/ my/our h.m.cousins
due /dué/ your bro duE /dués/ your bros
dué /duéi/ your brody duÉ /duéis/ your brodies
duë /duéu/ your male cousin duË /duéus/ your male cousins
duè /duée/ your brother duÈ /duées/ your brothers
duê /duéa/ your half brother duÊ /duéas/ your half brothers
duy /duéo/ your h.m.cousin duY /duéos/ your h.m.cousins
dee /deé/ their bro deE /deés/ their bros
deé /deéi/ their brody deÉ /deéis/ their brodies
deë /deéu/ their male cousin deË /deéus/ their male cousins
deè /deée/ their brother deÈ /deées/ their brothers
deê /deéa/ their half brother deÊ /deéas/ their half brothers
dey /deéo/ their h.m.cousin deY /deéos/ their h.m.cousins
dae /daé/ her/FP bro daE /daés/ her/FP bros
daé /daéi/ her/FP brody daÉ /daéis/ her/FP brodies
daë /daéu/ her/FP male cousin daË /daéus/ her/FP male cousins
daè /daée/ her/FP brother daÈ /daées/ her/FP brothers
daê /daéa/ her/FP half brother daÊ /daéas/ her/FP half brothers
day /daéo/ her/FP h.m.cousin daY /daéos/ her/FP h.m.cousins
doe /doé/ his/MP bro doE /doés/ his/MP bros
doé /doéi/ his/MP brody doÉ /doéis/ his/MP brodies
doë /doéu/ his/MP male cousin doË /doéus/ his/MP male cousins
doè /doée/ his/MP brother doÈ /doées/ his/MP brothers
doê /doéa/ his/MP half brother doÊ /doéas/ his/MP half brothers
doy /doéo/ his/MP h.m.cousin doY /doéos/ his/MP h.m.cousins
dIe /disé/ our bro dIE /disés/ our bros
dIé /diséi/ our brody dIÉ /diséis/ our brodies
dIë /diséu/ our male cousin dIË /diséus/ our male cousins
dIè /disée/ our brother dIÈ /disées/ our brothers
dIê /diséa/ our half brother dIÊ /diséas/ our half brothers
dIy /diséo/ our h.m.cousin dIY /diséos/ our h.m.cousins
dUe /dusé/ your(p)bro dUE /dusés/ your(p)bros
dUé /duséi/ your(p)brody dUÉ /duséis/ your(p)brodies
dUë /duséu/ your(p)male cousin dUË /duséus/ your(p)male cousins
dUè /dusée/ your(p)brother dUÈ /dusées/ your(p)brothers
dUê /duséa/ your(p)half brother dUÊ /duséas/ your(p)half brothers
dUy /duséo/ your(p)h.m.cousin dUY /duséos/ your(p)h.m.cousins
dEe /desé/ their(p)bro dEE /desés/ their(p)bros
dEé /deséi/ their(p)brody dEÉ /deséis/ their(p)brodies
dEë /deséu/ their(p)male cousin dEË /deséus/ their(p)male cousins
dEè /desée/ their(p)brother dEÈ /desées/ their(p)brothers
dEê /deséa/ their(p)half brother dEÊ /deséas/ their(p)half brothers
dEy /deséo/ their(p)h.m.cousin dEY /deséos/ their(p)h.m.cousins
dAe /dasé/ their(f)bro dAE /dasés/ their(f)bros
dAé /daséi/ their(f)brody dAÉ /daséis/ their(f)brodies
dAë /daséu/ their(f)male cousin dAË /daséus/ their(f)male cousins
dAè /dasée/ their(f)brother dAÈ /dasées/ their(f)brothers
dAê /daséa/ their(f)half brother dAÊ /daséas/ their(f)half brothers
dAy /daséo/ their(f)h.m.cousin dAY /daséos/ their(f)h.m.cousins
dOe /dosé/ their(m)bro dOE /dosés/ their(m)bros
dOé /doséi/ their(m)brody dOÉ /doséis/ their(m)brodies
dOë /doséu/ their(m)male cousin dOË /doséus/ their(m)male cousins
dOè /dosée/ their(m)brother dOÈ /dosées/ their(m)brothers
dOê /doséa/ their(m)half brother dOÊ /doséas/ their(m)half brothers
dOy /doséo/ their(m)h.m.cousin dOY /doséos/ their(m)h.m.cousins