Archive for December, 2016

yo can I get in the discord too?

Sunday, December 25th, 2016

Unfortunately, I don’t know who you are, but if you ask me off anon I’d love to send you the link!

21st Lexember Word

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

ankesocúp [änd͡ʑe̞̽zo̞̽ˈd͡zuˑp], nominalisation: “right side, right area”

image

Originally posted by heartsnmagic

Couldn’t find anything relevant, so here’s a puppy :).

So, today’s word is to socú what yesterday’s word was to hayré: a nominalisation referring to the environment of the speaker, rather than to a specific object or location. And really, there is nothing more to say about it that hasn’t been explained yesterday :).

Serí! Ankesocúp wataspá mo!: “No! Put it on the right please!”

21st Lexember Word

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

ankesocúp [änd͡ʑe̞̽zo̞̽ˈd͡zuˑp], nominalisation: “right side, right area”

image

Originally posted by heartsnmagic

Couldn’t find anything relevant, so here’s a puppy :).

So, today’s word is to socú what yesterday’s word was to hayré: a nominalisation referring to the environment of the speaker, rather than to a specific object or location. And really, there is nothing more to say about it that hasn’t been explained yesterday :).

Serí! Ankesocúp wataspá mo!: “No! Put it on the right please!”

#485

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

If your conlang doesn’t have any high front unrounded vowels, then make sure to not make any words for any reflective surfaces.
Because, as the prophet said, “how can mirrors be real if our /i/s aren’t real?”

20th Lexember Word

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

ankehayrép [änd͡ʑe̞̽ɦɐ͡ɪˈɾe̞ˑp], nominalisation: “left side, left area”

Originally posted by 2mainstreamhipster

Well, she’s looking in the right direction in any case.

Today’s word is simply a nominalisation of the verb hayré: “to be on the left”. However, it also uses the prefix anke-, which is worth mentioning. With nouns, and some verbs, anke- indicates that something is not what it appears to be, i.e. it means “pseudo-, mock”. However, with many verbs, it indicates instead that the entire environment of the speaker is involved, rather than a specific object. In this case, for instance, it indicates that what one is speaking about is the entire left side of the surroundings, from the point of view of the speaker (generally) rather than the left side of their body.

Ankehayrép wataspá ken: “Be a dear and put it on the left.”

20th Lexember Word

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

ankehayrép [änd͡ʑe̞̽ɦɐ͡ɪˈɾe̞ˑp], nominalisation: “left side, left area”

Originally posted by 2mainstreamhipster

Well, she’s looking in the right direction in any case.

Today’s word is simply a nominalisation of the verb hayré: “to be on the left”. However, it also uses the prefix anke-, which is worth mentioning. With nouns, and some verbs, anke- indicates that something is not what it appears to be, i.e. it means “pseudo-, mock”. However, with many verbs, it indicates instead that the entire environment of the speaker is involved, rather than a specific object. In this case, for instance, it indicates that what one is speaking about is the entire left side of the surroundings, from the point of view of the speaker (generally) rather than the left side of their body.

Ankehayrép wataspá ken: “Be a dear and put it on the left.”

#484

Monday, December 19th, 2016

In your conlang, /r/ and /l/ should both have a null allomorph when the words they are in get too hot. Yes, even in your conlang, liquids can evaporate.

19th Lexember Word

Monday, December 19th, 2016

aspá [äɕˈpäˑ], transitive (causative) verb: “to put, to place“

Originally posted by artemispanthar

Hey, it’s not so often I manage to work in a GIF of my current favourite cartoon :P.

Interestingly, this verb is simply the regular causative form (albeit one using an old, nowadays non-productive causative suffix) of the verb ás: “to be, to exist“, a verb also used to mark location. In other words, aspá literally means: “to cause to be (in a certain location)“. This is in fact a common characteristic of Haotyétpi: that it does not have a single verb for “to put”, but instead uses the causative forms of various position verbs, depending on the situation. In particular, aspá is only used when putting things on flat, non-enclosed surfaces (the floor of a room does count as “non-enclosed”, by the way).

Like many commonly used verbs, aspá has a plural form, used when the object of the verb is plural: armó.

Kaáspi seásyo aspán mik mare n’ ás?: “Where should I put this?“

19th Lexember Word

Monday, December 19th, 2016

aspá [äɕˈpäˑ], transitive (causative) verb: “to put, to place“

Originally posted by artemispanthar

Hey, it’s not so often I manage to work in a GIF of my current favourite cartoon :P.

Interestingly, this verb is simply the regular causative form (albeit one using an old, nowadays non-productive causative suffix) of the verb ás: “to be, to exist“, a verb also used to mark location. In other words, aspá literally means: “to cause to be (in a certain location)“. This is in fact a common characteristic of Haotyétpi: that it does not have a single verb for “to put”, but instead uses the causative forms of various position verbs, depending on the situation. In particular, aspá is only used when putting things on flat, non-enclosed surfaces (the floor of a room does count as “non-enclosed”, by the way).

Like many commonly used verbs, aspá has a plural form, used when the object of the verb is plural: armó.

Kaáspi seásyo aspán mik mare n’ ás?: “Where should I put this?“

Detail #322: Negativity and Volition

Sunday, December 18th, 2016
Whenever an action is somewhat complicated, performing the action almost never is unintentional. However, when not performing the action, intentionality may vary - you may have forgotten or otherwise failed to carry it out, or you may have decided not to do it at all, and as a third option, you may not have had any intention whatsoever. Thus, for a large number of actions, it seems more likely that conveying volition would be more natural and more necessary in the negative than in the positive.

What ways could such a distinction be encoded? There's a lot of them, really!

One way could be lack of person marking on verbs for the negative whenever volition is lacking; another could be different constructions altogether - something like English or Finnish for volitional negativity, something with just a negative particle for volitionless negativity. Yet another option could be negativity concord on objects and the like with volitional negativity.